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School Education, Learning-by-Doing, and Fertility in Economic Development

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  • Koji Kitaura
  • Akira Yakita

Abstract

We examine the policy implications of relaxing constraints on the educational choice of individuals for economic development. Distinguishing human capital accumulation through schooling and through learning-by-doing and knowledge spillovers, we show that in the earlier stages of development, mitigating and eventually eliminating constraints on school education would be necessary for even further economic development. Expanded school education increases the income of individuals and encourages physical capital accumulation, which enlarges productive knowledge through implementation and operations. The increased labor productivity thus boosts economic growth. In the process, the fertility rate will decline because of the increased education cost per child. Copyright (C) 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Koji Kitaura & Akira Yakita, 2010. "School Education, Learning-by-Doing, and Fertility in Economic Development," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(4), pages 736-749, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:rdevec:v:14:y:2010:i:4:p:736-749
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hirazawa, Makoto & Yakita, Akira, 2017. "Labor supply of elderly people, fertility, and economic development," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 75-96.
    2. Wei-Bin ZHANG, 2016. "Tourism and economic structural change with endogenous wealth and human capital and elastic labor supply," Theoretical and Applied Economics, Asociatia Generala a Economistilor din Romania - AGER, vol. 0(4(609), W), pages 103-126, Winter.

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