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School Education, Learning-by-Doing, and Fertility in Economic Development

  • Koji Kitaura
  • Akira Yakita

We examine the policy implications of relaxing constraints on the educational choice of individuals for economic development. Distinguishing human capital accumulation through schooling and through learning-by-doing and knowledge spillovers, we show that in the earlier stages of development, mitigating and eventually eliminating constraints on school education would be necessary for even further economic development. Expanded school education increases the income of individuals and encourages physical capital accumulation, which enlarges productive knowledge through implementation and operations. The increased labor productivity thus boosts economic growth. In the process, the fertility rate will decline because of the increased education cost per child. Copyright (C) 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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Article provided by Wiley Blackwell in its journal Review of Development Economics.

Volume (Year): 14 (2010)
Issue (Month): 4 (November)
Pages: 736-749

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Handle: RePEc:bla:rdevec:v:14:y:2010:i:4:p:736-749
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