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Slippage effects of land-based policies: Evaluating the Conservation Reserve Program using satellite imagery

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  • David A. Fleming

Abstract

type="main" xml:lang="es"> El Programa de Reservas para la Conservación (CRP, por sus siglas en inglés) es la principal política agrícola terrestre de los Estados Unidos. Varios estudios económicos han analizado este programa; sin embargo, sólo unos pocos han considerado sus implicaciones para las tierras no suscritas, es decir, sus efectos regionales sobre las decisiones de uso de del suelo. Este artículo examina el efecto indirecto de la CRP en la conversión de tierras no agrícolas para la agricultura; un fenómeno conocido como «canje» a tierras de labor. Partiendo de estudios anteriores, se establece empíricamente un modelo de «canje» a tierras de labor a nivel de condado que utiliza imágenes de satélite que permiten la observación de cambios específicos en la cubierta del suelo (p. ej. del bosque a la agricultura). Los resultados sugieren la existencia de este «canje» a tierras de labor debido a la CRP, pero bajo tasas variables dependiendo de la cubierta inicial del suelo.

Suggested Citation

  • David A. Fleming, 2014. "Slippage effects of land-based policies: Evaluating the Conservation Reserve Program using satellite imagery," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 93, pages 167-178, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:presci:v:93:y:2014:i::p:s167-s178
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/pirs.12049
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