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Mortality Shocks and Survivors' Consumption Growth

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  • Michael Grimm

Abstract

In contrast to health shocks, mortality shocks do not only induce direct costs such as medical and funeral expenses and possibly income loss, but also reduce the number of consumption units in the household. Using data from Indonesia, it is shown that the economic costs related to the death of children and older persons seem to be fully compensated for by the decrease in consumption units. In contrast, when prime-age adults die, survivors face additional costs and, in consequence, use coping strategies. These strategies seem to be quite effective, although households may face higher long-term vulnerability. Copyright (c) Blackwell Publishing Ltd and the Department of Economics, University of Oxford, 2009.

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  • Michael Grimm, 2010. "Mortality Shocks and Survivors' Consumption Growth," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 72(2), pages 146-171, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:obuest:v:72:y:2010:i:2:p:146-171
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    Cited by:

    1. Lazzaroni, Sara & Wagner, Natascha, 2016. "Misfortunes never come singly: Structural change, multiple shocks and child malnutrition in rural Senegal," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 246-262.
    2. Mani, Subha & Mitra, Sophie & Sambamoorthi, Usha, 2016. "Dynamics in Health and Employment: Evidence from Indonesia," IZA Discussion Papers 10256, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. repec:eee:wdevel:v:104:y:2018:i:c:p:297-309 is not listed on IDEAS

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