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The Stability of Self Assessed Health Status

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  • Thomas F. Crossley
  • Steven Kennedy

Abstract

The use of self assessed health status as a measure of health is common in empirical research. We analyse a unique Australian survey in which a random sub-sample of respondents answer a standard self assessed health question twice – before and after an additional set of health related questions. 28% of respondents change their reported health status. Response instability is related to age, income and occupation. We also compare the responses of these individuals to other respondents who are queried only once. The distributions of responses to both questions by the former group are statistically different from the distribution of responses by the latter group.

Suggested Citation

  • Thomas F. Crossley & Steven Kennedy, 2000. "The Stability of Self Assessed Health Status," CEPR Discussion Papers 421, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  • Handle: RePEc:auu:dpaper:421
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    File URL: https://www.cbe.anu.edu.au/researchpapers/cepr/DP421.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1994:84:7:1100-1105_7 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Deaton, Angus S & Paxson, Christina H, 1998. "Aging and Inequality in Income and Health," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 248-253, May.
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    4. Ettner, Susan L., 1996. "New evidence on the relationship between income and health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 67-85, February.
    5. P Grootendorst & D Feeny & W Furlong, 1994. "Does It Matter Whom and How You Ask? Inter and Intra-rater Agreement in the Ontario Health Survey," Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis Working Paper Series 1994-12, Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis (CHEPA), McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
    6. James P. Smith, 1999. "Healthy Bodies and Thick Wallets: The Dual Relation between Health and Economic Status," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(2), pages 145-166, Spring.
    7. Gerdtham, U. -G. & Johannesson, M. & Lundberg, L. & Isacson, D., 1999. "A note on validating Wagstaff and van Doorslaer's health measure in the analysis of inequalities in health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 117-124, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Irina, Mozhaeva, 2009. "Multidimensional health modeling: Association between socioeconomic and psychosocial factors and health in Latvia," MPRA Paper 24626, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Aug 2010.
    2. Anu Rammohan & Elisabetta Magnani, 2012. "Modelling the influence of caring for the elderly on migration: estimates and evidence from Indonesia," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(3), pages 399-420, December.
    3. Michael Grimm, 2010. "Mortality Shocks and Survivors' Consumption Growth," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 72(2), pages 146-171, April.
    4. Heather Scott-Marshall, 2010. "The Social Patterning of Work-Related Insecurity and its Health Consequences," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 96(2), pages 313-337, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Self assessed health status;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • C80 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - General

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