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Exchange Rate Regimes And Trade

  • CHRISTOPHER ADAM
  • DAVID COBHAM

A 'new version' of the gravity model is used to estimate the effect of a full range of de facto exchange rate regimes on bilateral trade. The results indicate that, while participation in a common currency union is typically strongly 'pro-trade', other exchange rate regimes which lower the exchange rate uncertainty and transactions costs associated with international trade are significantly more pro-trade than the default regime of a 'double float'. They suggest that the direct and indirect trade-creating effects of these regimes on uncertainty and transactions costs tend to outweigh the trade-diverting substitution effects. Tariff-equivalent monetary barriers associated with each exchange rate regime are also calculated. Copyright � 2007 The Authors; Journal compilation � 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and The University of Manchester.

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File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1467-9957.2007.01037.x
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Article provided by University of Manchester in its journal Manchester School.

Volume (Year): 75 (2007)
Issue (Month): s1 (09)
Pages: 44-63

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Handle: RePEc:bla:manchs:v:75:y:2007:i:s1:p:44-63
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  1. Levy-Yeyati, Eduardo & Sturzenegger, Federico, 2005. "Classifying exchange rate regimes: Deeds vs. words," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(6), pages 1603-1635, August.
  2. James E. Anderson & Eric van Wincoop, 2003. "Gravity with Gravitas: A Solution to the Border Puzzle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 170-192, March.
  3. Reinhart, Carmen & Rogoff, Kenneth, 2004. "The modern history of exchange rate arrangements: A reinterpretation," MPRA Paper 14070, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Husain, Aasim M. & Mody, Ashoka & Rogoff, Kenneth S., 2005. "Exchange rate regime durability and performance in developing versus advanced economies," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 35-64, January.
  5. Andrew K. Rose, 2001. "Currency unions and trade: the effect is large," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 16(33), pages 449-461, October.
  6. Andrew K. Rose & Eric van Wincoop, 2001. "National Money as a Barrier to International Trade: The Real Case for Currency Union," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 386-390, May.
  7. Reinhart, Carmen, 2002. "A Modern History of Exchange Rate Arrangements: Parallel Markets and Dual and Multiple Exchange Rates," MPRA Paper 13194, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Frankel, Jeffrey & Rose, Andrew K., 2001. "An Estimate of the Effect of Common Currencies on Trade and Income," Working Paper Series rwp01-013, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  9. Andrew Rose, 2005. "Which International Institutions Promote International Trade?," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(4), pages 682-698, 09.
  10. Reinhart, Carmen, 2002. "A Modern History of Exchange Rate Arrangements: The Country Histories, 1946-2001," MPRA Paper 13191, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  11. Emilia Magdalena Jurzyk & Bernhard Fritz-Krockow, 2004. "Will You Buy My Peg? the Credibility of a Fixed Exchange Rate Regime As a Determinant of Bilateral Trade," IMF Working Papers 04/165, International Monetary Fund.
  12. Atish R. Ghosh & Anne-Marie Gulde & Holger C. Wolf, 2003. "Exchange Rate Regimes: Choices and Consequences," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262072408, June.
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