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Stepping Stones to Permanent Employment in the Public Service


  • Gene Tunny
  • John Mangan


Labour force transitions are investigated using a longitudinal database covering staff movements in the Queensland public service. The database covers those who have entered the public service through traditional recruitment methods as well as those who have entered through temporary and casual appointments. The analysis is based on a new methodology of cumulative incidence function testing and competing risks regression analysis. Interest is centred on entry by non-standard employees and their subsequent transition through the public service. It was found that non-standard employment can be a stepping stone to permanent employment but only for about one in four new non-standard employees. Copyright 2004 CEIS, Fondazione Giacomo Brodolini and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Gene Tunny & John Mangan, 2004. "Stepping Stones to Permanent Employment in the Public Service," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 18(4), pages 591-614, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:18:y:2004:i:4:p:591-614

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & Serrano-Padial, Ricardo, 2010. "Labor market flexibility and poverty dynamics," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 632-642, August.
    2. Steve Bradley & Colin Green & Gareth Leeves, 2014. "Employment Protection, Threat and Incentive Effects on Worker Absence," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 52(2), pages 333-358, June.

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