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The Cost Of Differential Gender Roles In African Agriculture: A Case Study Of Smallholder Banana-Coffee Farms In The Kagera Region, Tanzania


  • Anna Tibaijuka


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  • Anna Tibaijuka, 1994. "The Cost Of Differential Gender Roles In African Agriculture: A Case Study Of Smallholder Banana-Coffee Farms In The Kagera Region, Tanzania," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(1), pages 69-81.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jageco:v:45:y:1994:i:1:p:69-81

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Collier, Paul, 1988. "Women in development : defining the issues," Policy Research Working Paper Series 129, The World Bank.
    2. Becker, Gary S, 1985. "Human Capital, Effort, and the Sexual Division of Labor," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(1), pages 33-58, January.
    3. Edward B. Barbier, 1990. "The Farm-Level Economics of Soil Conservation: The Uplands of Java," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 66(2), pages 199-211.
    4. Harris, John R & Todaro, Michael P, 1970. "Migration, Unemployment & Development: A Two-Sector Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 60(1), pages 126-142, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Haddad, Lawrence & Oshaug, Arne, 1998. "How does the human rights perspective help to shape the food and nutrition policy research agenda?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 329-345, October.
    2. Fofack, Hippolyte, 2013. "A model of gendered production in colonial Africa and implications for development in the post-colonial period," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6438, The World Bank.
    3. Isabel Ruiz & Carlos Vargas-Silva, 2017. "The impact of hosting refugees on the intra-household allocation of tasks: A gender perspective," WIDER Working Paper Series 066, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Darity, William Jr., 1995. "The formal structure of a gender-segregated low-income economy," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(11), pages 1963-1968, November.
    5. Sen, Gita, 2000. "Gender Mainstreaming in Finance Ministries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(7), pages 1379-1390, July.
    6. Andre Croppenstedt & Markus Goldstein & Nina Rosas, 2013. "Gender and Agriculture: Inefficiencies, Segregation, and Low Productivity Traps," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 28(1), pages 79-109, February.
    7. Jasmine Gideon, 1999. "Looking at Economies as Gendered Structures: An Application to Central America," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(1), pages 1-28.
    8. Diksha Arora, 2014. "Gender Differences in Time Poverty in Rural Mozambique," Working Paper Series, Department of Economics, University of Utah 2014_05, University of Utah, Department of Economics.

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