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Capital Inflows, Resource Reallocation and the Real Exchange Rate

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  • Emmanuel K. K. Lartey

Abstract

A large capital inflow to a developing economy can potentially cause a real exchange rate appreciation that is detrimental to the prospects of its tradable sector; a phenomenon known as the Dutch Disease. I analyse the effects of both the level and share of capital inflow on resource reallocation and real exchange rate movements in a small open economy. I find that there exists a trade-off between resource reallocation and the degree of real exchange rate appreciation. In particular, the less labour the tradable sector loses to the non-tradable sector, the greater is the real exchange rate appreciation. This result is driven by the share of investment accounted for by foreign capital, and suggests that an emerging market economy that adopts a production technique which utilizes a greater share of foreign capital relative to domestic capital will be more susceptible to the Dutch Disease following an increase in capital inflow. The results also imply that a policy designed to minimize real exchange rate appreciation during capital inflow episodes should encompass measures aimed at stabilizing prices of non-tradables. Copyright 2008 The Author. Journal compilation 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

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  • Emmanuel K. K. Lartey, 2008. "Capital Inflows, Resource Reallocation and the Real Exchange Rate," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 11(2), pages 131-152, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:intfin:v:11:y:2008:i:2:p:131-152
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    7. Mark Gertler & Simon Gilchrist & Fabio M. Natalucci, 2007. "External Constraints on Monetary Policy and the Financial Accelerator," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 39(2-3), pages 295-330, March.
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    9. Guillermo A. Calvo & Leonardo Leiderman & Carmen M. Reinhart, 1993. "Capital Inflows and Real Exchange Rate Appreciation in Latin America: The Role of External Factors," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 40(1), pages 108-151, March.
    10. M. Ayhan Kose & Raymond Riezman, 2013. "Trade shocks and macroeconomic fluctuations in Africa," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: International Trade Agreements and Political Economy, chapter 19, pages 369-394 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
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    Cited by:

    1. Pinar Yesin, 2016. "Capital Flows and the Swiss Franc," Working Papers 16.04, Swiss National Bank, Study Center Gerzensee.
    2. Acosta, Pablo A. & Lartey, Emmanuel K.K. & Mandelman, Federico S., 2009. "Remittances and the Dutch disease," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(1), pages 102-116, September.
    3. Pilar Poncela & Eva Senra & Lya Paola Sierra, 2017. "Long-term links between raw materials prices, real exchange rate and relative de-industrialization in a commodity-dependent economy: empirical evidence of “Dutch disease” in Colombia," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 52(2), pages 777-798, March.
    4. Menon, Jayant, 2009. "Managing Success in Viet Nam: Macroeconomic Consequences of Large Capital Inflows with Limited Policy Tools," Working Papers on Regional Economic Integration 27, Asian Development Bank.
    5. Gasmi, Farid & Laourari, Imène, 2017. "Has Algeria suffered from the dutch disease?: Evidence from 1960–2013 data," TSE Working Papers 17-780, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
    6. Gil Kim & Lian An & Yoonbai Kim, 2015. "Exchange Rate, Capital Flow and Output: Developed versus Developing Economies," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 43(2), pages 195-207, June.
    7. Maja Bukovšak & Gorana Lukinić Čardić & Nina Ranilović, 2017. "Structure of Capital Flows and Exchange Rate: The Case of Croatia," Working Papers 52, The Croatian National Bank, Croatia.
    8. Thomas Goda & Alejandro Torres García, 2015. "Flujos de capital, recursos naturales y enfermedad holandesa: el caso colombiano," Ensayos sobre Política Económica, Banco de la Republica de Colombia, vol. 33(78), pages 197-206, Diciembre.
    9. Emmanuel K. K. Lartey, 2011. "Financial Openness and the Dutch Disease," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(3), pages 556-568, August.
    10. Lartey, Emmanuel K.K., 2012. "Financial openness, nontradable inflation and optimal monetary policy," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(3), pages 782-785.
    11. Hur, Joonyoung & Lartey, Emmanuel K.K., 2016. "Financial openness, the financial accelerator and sectoral dynamics," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 277-290.

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