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Moonlighting in a High Growth Economy: Evidence from U.S. State-Level Data

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  • Mark Partridge

Abstract

Despite the prevalence of multiple jobholding, there is relatively little research into its causes. Existing research has tested the predictions of standard labor models with micro data. Yet, there has been virtually no research into the relationship between moonlighting and structural differences in regional labor markets such as wages and employment growth. In this manner, this study examines the large differences in multiple jobholding rates across U.S. states. The findings indicate that multiple jobholding acts as a short-term shock absorber to cyclical changes. However, in the long-term, these effects dissipate, indicating that moonlighting plays a similar role as do changes in unemployment and labor-force participation to regional labor market shocks. Conversely, multiple jobholding rates are inversely related to average weekly earnings. Thus, job growth accompanied by real wage (and productivity) growth may result in a decline in multiple jobholding, further exacerbating potential labor shortages. Other key factors found to influence multiple jobholding include occupational structure and education. Copyright 2002 Gatton College of Business and Economics, University of Kentucky.

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  • Mark Partridge, 2002. "Moonlighting in a High Growth Economy: Evidence from U.S. State-Level Data," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(4), pages 424-452.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:growch:v:33:y:2002:i:4:p:424-452
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Paxson, Christina H & Sicherman, Nachum, 1996. "The Dynamics of Dual Job Holding and Job Mobility," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 14(3), pages 357-393, July.
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    6. Krishnan, Pramila, 1990. "The Economics of Moonlighting: A Double Self-Selection Model: Errata," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 72(4), pages 712-712, November.
    7. Krishnan, Pramila, 1990. "The Economics of Moonlighting: A Double Self-Selection Model," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 72(2), pages 361-367, May.
    8. Lewis M. Segal & Daniel G. Sullivan, 1997. "The Growth of Temporary Services Work," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(2), pages 117-136, Spring.
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    Cited by:

    1. Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & Kimmel, Jean, 2005. "Moonlighting Behavior over the Business Cycle," IZA Discussion Papers 1671, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Hirsch, Barry & Husain, Muhammad M. & Winters, John V., 2016. "The Puzzling Fixity of Multiple Job Holding across Regions and Labor Markets," IZA Discussion Papers 9631, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Andrew Atherton & João R. Faria & Daniel Wheatley & Dongxu Wu & Zhongmin Wu, 2016. "The decision to moonlight: does second job holding by the self-employed and employed differ?," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(3), pages 279-299, May.
    4. Ilias Livanos & Alexandros Zangelidis, 2012. "Multiple Job-holding among Male Workers in Greece," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(1), pages 119-135, March.
    5. Barry T. Hirsch & Muhammad M. Husain & John V. Winters, 2016. "Multiple job holding, local labor markets, and the business cycle," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-29, December.
    6. Pouliakas, Konstantinos & Panos, Georgios & Zangelidis, Alexandros, 2009. "The Inter-Related Dynamics of Dual Job Holding, Human Capital and Occupational Choice," MPRA Paper 16859, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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