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The role of political constraints in transition strategies

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  • Gerard Roland

Abstract

This paper trys to clarify the political economy arguments underlying the big bang and the gradualist approach to economic transition. The big bang approach emphasizes the importance of windows of opportunity when ex ante political constraints are less binding, whereas gradualist programmes are defended because of their higher ex ante political feasibility. Both approaches aim at achieving irreversibility, but through different means. The big bang approach emphasizes how speed in reforms may constrain a successor government, whereas the gradualist approach tries to design the sequencing of reforms so as to build, at each stage of transition, constituencies for further reform.
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Suggested Citation

  • Gerard Roland, 1994. "The role of political constraints in transition strategies," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 2(1), pages 27-41, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:etrans:v:2:y:1994:i:1:p:27-41
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Roland, Gerard & Verdier, Thierry, 1994. "Privatization in Eastern Europe : Irreversibility and critical mass effects," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 161-183, June.
    2. Dewatripont, Mathias & Roland, Gerard, 1995. "The Design of Reform Packages under Uncertainty," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1207-1223, December.
    3. Kevin M. Murphy & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1992. "The Transition to a Market Economy: Pitfalls of Partial Reform," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(3), pages 889-906.
    4. Dewatripont, M & Roland, G, 1992. "The Virtues of Gradualism and Legitimacy in the Transition to a Market Economy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 102(411), pages 291-300, March.
    5. Roland, Gerard, 1994. "On the Speed and Sequencing of Privatisation and Restructuring," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(426), pages 1158-1168, September.
    6. Mathias Dewatripont, 1992. "Economic Reform and Dynamic Political Constraints," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/175991, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    7. M. Dewatripont & G. Roland, 1992. "Economic Reform and Dynamic Political Constraints," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 59(4), pages 703-730.
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    Cited by:

    1. Digdowiseiso, Kumba, 2010. "The transition of China and Ussr: A political economy perspective," MPRA Paper 22561, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Kym Anderson & Gordon Rausser & Johan Swinnen, 2013. "Political Economy of Public Policies: Insights from Distortions to Agricultural and Food Markets," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 51(2), pages 423-477, June.
    3. Kornai, János, 1995. "Négy jellegzetesség. A magyar fejlődés politikai gazdaságtani megközelítésben. Első rész
      [Four characteristic features. Development in Hungary from the aspect of political economy. First Part]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(12), pages 1097-1117.
    4. John S. Earle & Scott Gehlbach, 2003. "A Spoonful of Sugar: Privatization and Popular Support for Reform in the Czech Republic," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(1), pages 1-32, March.
    5. Erjon Luci & Marta Muco & Peter Sanfey, 2001. "Stabilization, monetary policy and financial institutions in Albania," wiiw Balkan Observatory Working Papers 16, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    6. Randolph Luca Bruno, 2003. "Speed of Transition, Unemployment Dynamics and Nonemployment Policies: Evidence from the Visegrad Countries," LEM Papers Series 2003/23, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    7. Litwack, John M. & Qian, Yingyi, 1998. "Balanced or Unbalanced Development: Special Economic Zones as Catalysts for Transition," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 117-141, March.
    8. repec:wfo:wstudy:46856 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Pasquale Tridico, 2013. "Values, Institutions, and Models of Institutional Change in Transition Economies," Challenge, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 56(3), pages 6-27.
    10. Schmitz, P. Michael & Noeth, Cornelia, 1997. "Institutional and Organizational Forces Shaping the Agricultural Transformation Process: Experiences, Causes and Implications," 1997 Conference, August 10-16, 1997, Sacramento, California 197042, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    11. Gerard Rpland, 2001. "The Political Economy of Transition," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 413, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    12. Petr Rozmahel & Ludek Kouba & Ladislava Grochová & Nikola Najman, 2013. "Integration of Central and Eastern European Countries: Increasing EU Heterogeneity?," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 9, WWWforEurope.
    13. Lyons, Robert F. & Rausser, Gordon C. & Simon, Leo K., 1996. "Putty-clay politics in transition economies," Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, UC Berkeley, Working Paper Series qt0t30p88v, Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, UC Berkeley.
    14. Michalska, Grazyna & Goodhue, Rachael & Small, Arthur, 1995. "Implications of Gatt for Eastern Europe and the Baltics," CUDARE Working Papers 201478, University of California, Berkeley, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    15. Matija Rojec & Janez Sustersic & Bostjan Vasle & Marijana Bednas & Slavica Jurancic, 2004. "The rise and decline of gradualism in Slovenia," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(4), pages 459-482.
    16. John Litwack & Yingyi Qian, "undated". "Balanced or Unbalanced Development: Special Economic Zones as Catalysts for Transition," Working Papers 97044, Stanford University, Department of Economics.
    17. Hillman, Arye L. & Ursprung, Heinrich W., 1996. "The political economy of trade liberalization in the transition," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(3-5), pages 783-794, April.
    18. Maw, James, 2002. "Partial privatization in transition economies," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 271-282, September.
    19. Kornai, János, 1996. "Négy jellegzetesség. A magyar fejlődés politikai gazdaságtani megközelítésben. Második rész
      [Four characteristic features. Development in Hungary from the aspect of political economy - II]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(1), pages 1-29.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H89 - Public Economics - - Miscellaneous Issues - - - Other
    • P50 - Economic Systems - - Comparative Economic Systems - - - General

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