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The transition of China and Ussr: A political economy perspective

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  • Digdowiseiso, Kumba

Abstract

This paper will focus on how the transition in China differs from that of USSR in terms of the Big Bang (shock therapy) and the Gradualist approach. While many econometric studies show that nations which apply both shock therapy and or gradualism end up at the same point, making the debate unnecessary, the author believes that gradualism was far more successfully implemented than the latter. When reforming the structure of the economy, it has to be remembered that a market based solution is a means not an end and it is more important “getting it right” than transitioning as fast as possible to ensure a level of playing field and long term sustainable growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Digdowiseiso, Kumba, 2010. "The transition of China and Ussr: A political economy perspective," MPRA Paper 22561, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:22561
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Transition; Reform; Economics; Politics;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • P11 - Economic Systems - - Capitalist Systems - - - Planning, Coordination, and Reform
    • P30 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - General
    • P51 - Economic Systems - - Comparative Economic Systems - - - Comparative Analysis of Economic Systems

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