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The Retirement Expectations of Middle-aged Australians




We use HILDA data to examine the retirement plans of middle-aged Australians. We find that approximately two-thirds of men and more than half of women report a numeric expected retirement age which we refer to as having a standard retirement plan. Still, one in five individuals seem to have delayed their retirement planning and approximately 1 in 11 either does not know when he or she expects to retire or expects to never retire. Retirement plans are closely related to current labour market position, with workers in jobs with well-defined superannuation benefits more likely to report numeric expected retirement ages. Copyright © 2009 The Economic Society of Australia.

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  • Deborah A. Cobb-Clark & Steven Stillman, 2009. "The Retirement Expectations of Middle-aged Australians," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 85(269), pages 146-163, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:85:y:2009:i:269:p:146-163

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    Cited by:

    1. Barrett, Alan & Mosca, Irene, 2012. "Announcing an Increase in the State Pension Age and the Recession: Which Mattered More for Expected Retirement Ages?," IZA Discussion Papers 6325, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Garry F. Barrett & Matthew Brzozowski, 2010. "Involuntary Retirement and the Resolution of the Retirement-Consumption Puzzle: Evidence from Australia," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 275, McMaster University.
    3. Jonathan Kennedy & Peter Matwijiw, 2010. "Retirement Savings: A Consumer Perspective," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 43(3), pages 321-325.

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