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Studies of the Labour Supply of Australian Women: What Have We Learned?

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  • ELISA-ROSE BIRCH

Abstract

Economic theory suggests that women's labour supply decisions can be understood through the careful modelling of their preferences for work and leisure and of the constraints that they face. Potential factors that influence this decision-making process might be of an economic, demographic or institutional nature. The present paper reviews the empirical evidence on the influence of these factors on women's labour supply in Australia. It shows that while there is a broad consensus in some areas, there is generally a wide range of findings in relation to each potential determinant of labour supply. Moreover, this does not seem to have been narrowed by the use of more sophisticated methodology. Copyright 2005 The Economic Society Of Australia.

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  • Elisa-Rose Birch, 2005. "Studies of the Labour Supply of Australian Women: What Have We Learned?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 81(252), pages 65-84, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:81:y:2005:i:252:p:65-84
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:ecanpo:v:55:y:2017:i:c:p:14-24 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Hanel, Barbara & Kalb, Guyonne & Scott, Anthony, 2014. "Nurses’ labour supply elasticities: The importance of accounting for extensive margins," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 94-112.
    3. Magnus Gustavsson & Pär Österholm, 2007. "Does Unemployment Hysteresis Equal Employment Hysteresis?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 83(261), pages 159-173, June.
    4. Ross Guest & Nick Parr, 2013. "Family policy and couples’ labour supply: an empirical assessment," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(4), pages 1631-1660, October.
    5. Anu Rammohan & Stephen Whelan, 2006. "Child Care Costs and the Employment Status of Married Australian Mothers," CEPR Discussion Papers 517, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    6. Joanna Abhayaratna & Les Andrews & Hudan Nuch & Troy Podbury, 2008. "Part Time Employment: the Australian Experience," Staff Working Papers 0805, Productivity Commission, Government of Australia.
    7. Guyonne Kalb, 2009. "Children, Labour Supply and Child Care: Challenges for Empirical Analysis," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 42(3), pages 276-299.

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