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Analysis of the 1980 Sydney Survey of Work Patterns of Married Women: Further Results

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  • Ross, Russell T.

Abstract

Using cross section data from the 1980 Sydney Survey of the work patterns of married women, this paper contributes to the very scarce Australian stock of disaggregate econometric studies of the labour market activities of married women. Labour force participation, hours of work and wage (reservation wage as well as market wage) functions are estimated in a second generation static labour supply framework. Unique features of the study include the availability of direct data on previous market experience, a formulation of the impact of children on the participation decision which permits testing for the presence of economies of scale in child minding activities, estimation of the reservation wage function, and a data base which permits a clear distinction between earnings and other forms of income.

Suggested Citation

  • Ross, Russell T., 1985. "Analysis of the 1980 Sydney Survey of Work Patterns of Married Women: Further Results," Working Papers 79, University of Sydney, School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:syd:wpaper:2123/7387
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    Cited by:

    1. Sandra Dandie & Joseph Mercante, 2007. "Australian labour supply elasticities: Comparison and critical review," Treasury Working Papers 2007-04, The Treasury, Australian Government, revised Oct 2007.
    2. Piggott, John & Whalley, John, 1996. "The Tax Unit and Household Production," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(2), pages 398-418, April.
    3. Hielke BUDDELMEYER & Guyonne KALB, "undated". "Labour Supply and Welfare Participation in the Australian Population: Using Observed Job Search to Account for Involuntary Unemployment," EcoMod2008 23800020, EcoMod.
    4. Guyonne Kalb & Wang-Sheng Lee, 2008. "Childcare Use And Parents' Labour Supply In Australia ," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(3), pages 272-295, September.
    5. Guyonne R. Kalb, 2000. "Labour Supply and Welfare Participation in Australian Two-Adult Households: Accounting for Involuntary Unemployment and the 'Cost' of Part-time Work," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers bp-35, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
    6. John Freebairn, 1998. "Microeconomics of the Australian Labour Market," RBA Annual Conference Volume,in: Guy Debelle & Jeff Borland (ed.), Unemployment and the Australian Labour Market Reserve Bank of Australia.

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