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Welfare Reform and the Labour Supply of Lone Parents in Australia: A Natural Experiment Approach


  • Denise J. Doiron


Large shifts in the labour supply of lone parents in Australia were observed between 1986 and 1990. Changes in the observed characteristics of lone parents explain only a small portion of these shifts. Propensity score matching and difference-in-differences are used to estimate the effects of the substantial policy shifts implemented in 1987. Control groups are constructed from the sample of married mothers. Results suggest that the policy reforms caused a substantial increase in the employment of lone parents while causing a reduction in the hours of work among the workers. Copyright © 2004 Economic Society of Australia..

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  • Denise J. Doiron, 2004. "Welfare Reform and the Labour Supply of Lone Parents in Australia: A Natural Experiment Approach," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 80(249), pages 157-176, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:80:y:2004:i:249:p:157-176

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    Cited by:

    1. Lixin Cai & Guyonne Kalb & Yi-Ping Tseng & Ha Vu, 2008. "The Effect of Financial Incentives on Labour Supply: Evidence for Lone Parents from Microsimulation and Quasi-Experimental Evaluation," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 29(2), pages 285-325, June.
    2. Robert Breunig & Deborah A. Cobb-Clark & Xiaodong Gong, 2008. "Improving the Modelling of Couples' Labour Supply," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 84(267), pages 466-485, December.
    3. Marike Knoef & Jan C. van Ours, 2016. "How to stimulate single mothers on welfare to find a job: evidence from a policy experiment," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 29(4), pages 1025-1061, October.
    4. Fisher, Hayley & Zhu, Anna, 2016. "The Effect of Changing Financial Incentives on Repartnering," IZA Discussion Papers 10243, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Vincent Law, 2011. "Welfare Policy and Labour Supply of Immigrants in Australia," Crawford School Research Papers 1109, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    6. Yin King Fok & Sung-Hee Jeon & Roger Wilkins, 2009. "Does Part-Time Employment Help or Hinder Lone Mothers Movements into Full-Time Employment?," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2009n25, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    7. Frish, Roni & Zussman, Noam, 2008. "The effect of transfer payments on the labor supply of single mothers," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 627-643, April.
    8. Jeff Borland & Yi-Ping Tseng & Roger Wilkins, 2005. "Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Methods of Microeconomic Program and Policy Evaluation," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2005n08, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    9. Xiaodong Gong & Robert Breunig, 2014. "Channels of labour supply responses of lone parents to changed work incentives," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 66(4), pages 916-939.
    10. John Creedy & Guyonne Kalb, 2005. "Behavioural Microsimulation Modelling for Tax Policy Analysis in Australia: Experience and Prospects," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 8(1), pages 73-110, March.
    11. Guyonne Kalb, 2010. "Modelling Labour Supply Responses in Australia and New Zealand," Chapters,in: Tax Reform in Open Economies, chapter 8 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    12. John Creedy & Guyonne Kalb, 2005. "Behavioural Microsimulation Modelling With the Melbourne Institute Tax and Transfer Simulator(MITTS) : Uses and Extensions," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 932, The University of Melbourne.

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