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Peer Evaluations And Team Performance: When Friends Do Worse Than Strangers

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  • BRICE CORGNET

Abstract

We use peer assessments as a tool to allocate joint profits in a real effort team experiment. We find that using this incentive mechanism reduces team performance. More specifically, we show that teams composed of fellows rather than strangers actually underperform in a context of peer evaluations. We conjecture that peer evaluations undermine the inherently high level of intrinsic motivation that characterizes teams composed of friends. We finally analyze the determinants of peer assessments and stress the crucial importance of equality concerns.
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Suggested Citation

  • Brice Corgnet, 2012. "Peer Evaluations And Team Performance: When Friends Do Worse Than Strangers," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 50(1), pages 171-181, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecinqu:v:50:y:2012:i:1:p:171-181
    DOI: j.1465-7295.2010.00354.x
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1465-7295.2010.00354.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Encinosa III, William E. & Gaynor, Martin & Rebitzer, James B., 2007. "The sociology of groups and the economics of incentives: Theory and evidence on compensation systems," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 187-214, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Konow, James & Saijo, Tatsuyoshi & Akai, Kenju, 2016. "Equity versus Equality," MPRA Paper 75376, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Grischa Perino & Luca A. Panzone & Timothy Swanson, 2014. "Motivation Crowding In Real Consumption Decisions: Who Is Messing With My Groceries?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(2), pages 592-607, April.
    3. Carpenter, Jeffrey P. & Robbett, Andrea & Akbar, Prottoy, 2016. "Profit Sharing and Peer Reporting," IZA Discussion Papers 9946, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C92 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Group Behavior
    • M12 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Personnel Management; Executives; Executive Compensation
    • M54 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Labor Management

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