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Obesity and Access to Chain Grocers

Author

Listed:
  • Susan Chen
  • Raymond J. G. M. Florax
  • Samantha Snyder
  • Christopher C. Miller

Abstract

Recent empirical work in the obesity literature has highlighted the role of the built environment and its potential influence in the increasing prevalence of obesity in adults and children. One feature of the built environment that has gained increasing attention is the role of access to chain grocers and their impact on body mass index (BMI). The assessment of the impacts of spatial access to chain grocers on BMI is complicated by two empirical regularities in the data. There is evidence that health outcomes such as BMI are clustered in space and that there is spatial dependence across individuals. In this article, we use an econometric model that takes into account the spatial dependence, and we allow the effect of access to differ for a person depending on whether he or she lives in a low-income community or peer group. We categorize this community using the characteristics of the people who immediately surround the individual rather than using census tracts. Using georeferenced survey data on adults in Marion County, Indiana, we find that the effect of improvements in chain grocer access on BMI varies depending on community characteristics. Copyright (c) 2010 Clark University.

Suggested Citation

  • Susan Chen & Raymond J. G. M. Florax & Samantha Snyder & Christopher C. Miller, 2010. "Obesity and Access to Chain Grocers," Economic Geography, Clark University, vol. 86(4), pages 431-452, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecgeog:v:86:y:2010:i:4:p:431-452
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    Cited by:

    1. Rahkovsky, Ilya & Snyder, Samantha, 2015. "Food Choices and Store Proximity," Economic Research Report 210316, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    2. Leonard, Tammy & McKillop, Caitlin & Carson, Jo Ann & Shuval, Kerem, 2014. "Neighborhood effects on food consumption," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 99-113.
    3. Matthew, Salois, 2010. "Obesity and Diabetes, the Built Environment, and the ‘Local’ Food Economy," MPRA Paper 27945, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Martinho, Vítor João Pereira Domingues, 2011. "Spatial autocorrelation and Verdoorn law in the Portuguese nuts III," MPRA Paper 32165, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. repec:taf:applec:v:48:y:2016:i:47:p:4526-4537 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Jessie Handbury & Ilya Rahkovsky & Molly Schnell, 2015. "Is the Focus on Food Deserts Fruitless? Retail Access and Food Purchases Across the Socioeconomic Spectrum," NBER Working Papers 21126, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Ver Ploeg, Michele & Dutko, Paula & Snyder, Samantha D. & Kaufman, Phillip R. & Breneman, Vincent E. & Williams, Ryan Blake & Dicken, Chris, 2012. "Enhanced Data and Methods for Estimating Access to Affordable and Nutritious Food for Population Characteristics," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124703, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    8. Xun Li & Rigoberto A. Lopez, 2016. "Food environment and weight outcomes: a stochastic frontier approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(47), pages 4526-4537, October.
    9. Lin, Biing-Hwan & Ver Ploeg, Michele & Kasteridis, Panagiotis & Yen, Steven T., 2014. "The roles of food prices and food access in determining food purchases of low-income households," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 938-952.
    10. Rabinowitz, Adam N. & Berning, Joshua & Campbell, Benjamin, 2015. "Examining the Influence of the Food Environment on Household Food Security," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 206271, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.
    11. Mouhcine Guettabi & Abdul Munasib, 2014. "“Space Obesity”: The Effect of Remoteness on County Obesity," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(4), pages 518-548, December.
    12. Mancino, Lisa & Ploeg, Michele Ver, 2013. "Stress in the desert: Estimating the relationship among diet quality, allostatic load and food access," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150613, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    13. Salois, Matthew & Balcombe, Kelvin, 2011. "Do Food Stamps Cause Obesity? A Generalised Bayesian Instrumental Variable Approach in the Presence of Heteroscedasticity," MPRA Paper 28745, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. repec:bla:tvecsg:v:108:y:2017:i:5:p:605-624 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Mumford, Elizabeth A. & Liu, Weiwei & Hair, Elizabeth C. & Yu, Tzy-Chyi, 2013. "Concurrent trajectories of BMI and mental health patterns in emerging adulthood," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 1-7.

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