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What is New in Protectionism? Consumers, Cranks, and Captives

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  • William A. Kerr

Abstract

"The most contentious international trade issues currently arise not from traditional producer requests for protection, but as a result of consumers and other economic agents asking governments to erect trade barriers. The economic model that underpins multilateral trade policy-as manifest in World Trade Organization (WTO) agreements-only predicts that firms will lobby for protection, with no provisions for how governments faced with requests for protection from other groups can respond. Consequently, governments have been forced to defend the imposition of trade barriers using spurious justifications; the WTO dispute mechanism has largely dismissed these justifications, and consumers (and others) feel disenfranchised. The result has been a loss of credibility for the WTO and sometimes its demonization. The WTO needs to change but a new economic model must also be developed to deal with a broader spectrum of protectionist interests." Copyright (c) 2010 Canadian Agricultural Economics Society.

Suggested Citation

  • William A. Kerr, 2010. "What is New in Protectionism? Consumers, Cranks, and Captives," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 58(1), pages 5-22, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:canjag:v:58:y:2010:i:1:p:5-22
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kenneth F. Scheve & Matthew J. Slaughter, 2001. "Globalization and the Perceptions of American Workers," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 109.
    2. Roberts, Donna, 1998. "Preliminary Assessment of the Effects of the WTO Agreement on Sanitary and Phytosanitary Trade Regulations," Journal of International Economic Law, Oxford University Press, vol. 1(3), pages 377-405, September.
    3. Frode Alfnes, 2004. "Stated preferences for imported and hormone-treated beef: application of a mixed logit model," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 31(1), pages 19-37, March.
    4. Jayson L. Lusk & Jutta Roosen & John A. Fox, 2003. "Demand for Beef from Cattle Administered Growth Hormones or Fed Genetically Modified Corn: A Comparison of Consumers in France, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(1), pages 16-29.
    5. Paul A. Samuelson, 2004. "Where Ricardo and Mill Rebut and Confirm Arguments of Mainstream Economists Supporting Globalization," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 18(3), pages 135-146, Summer.
    6. Samira Bakhshi & William A. Kerr, 2008. "Incorporating labour standards in trade agreements: protectionist ploy or legitimate trade policy issue?," International Journal of Trade and Global Markets, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 1(4), pages 373-391.
    7. Kerr, William A., 2007. "International Trade Education: Do We Need a New Model for the Global Market?," Estey Centre Journal of International Law and Trade Policy, Estey Centre for Law and Economics in International Trade, vol. 8(1).
    8. Hobbs, A. L. & Hobbs, J. E. & Isaac, G. E. & Kerr, W. A., 2002. "Ethics, domestic food policy and trade law: assessing the EU animal welfare proposal to the WTO," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(5-6), pages 437-454.
    9. James D. Gaisford & William A. Kerr, 2001. "Economic Analysis for International Trade Negotiations," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2243.
    10. Hobbs, Jill E. & Kerr, William A., 2006. "Consumer information, labelling and international trade in agri-food products," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 78-89, February.
    11. William A. Kerr & James D. Gaisford (ed.), 2007. "Handbook on International Trade Policy," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 3521.
    12. Kareen L. Holtby & William A. Kerr & Jill E. Hobbs, 2007. "International Environmental Liability and Barriers to Trade," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 12610.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Stuart Smyth & William Kerr & Peter W. B. Phillips, 2015. "The Unintended Consequences of Technological Change: Winners and Losers from GM Technologies and the Policy Response in the Organic Food Market," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(6), pages 1-17, June.
    2. Kerr, William A., 2012. "The EU-Canada Free Trade Agreement: What is on the Table for Agriculture?," 86th Annual Conference, April 16-18, 2012, Warwick University, Coventry, UK 135067, Agricultural Economics Society.
    3. Nakuja, Tekuni & Kerr, William A., 2013. "Was Food Safety Declining?: Assessing the Justification for the US Food Safety Modernisation Act," Commissioned Papers 145969, Canadian Agricultural Trade Policy Research Network.
    4. Moon, Wanki & Saldias, Gabriel Pino, 2013. "Public Preferences about Agricultural Protectionism in the US," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150718, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    5. Kerr, William A., 2016. "Disequilibrium, Trade and the Consequenses of Adjustment," Estey Centre Journal of International Law and Trade Policy, Estey Centre for Law and Economics in International Trade, vol. 17(2).
    6. Gleim, Savannah & Smyth, Stuart J. & Phillips, Peter W.B., 2016. "Regulatory System Impacts on Global GM Crop Adoption Patterns," Estey Centre Journal of International Law and Trade Policy, Estey Centre for Law and Economics in International Trade, vol. 17(2).
    7. Kerr, William A., 2015. "Governance of International Trade in Genetically Modified Organisms: Is Future Global Food Security at Risk?," Estey Centre Journal of International Law and Trade Policy, Estey Centre for Law and Economics in International Trade, vol. 16(2).
    8. repec:bpj:bjafio:v:15:y:2017:i:1:p:17:n:2 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Smyth, Stuart & Kerr, William A. & Phillips, Peter, 2010. "The Incompatibility of Science and Trade at the International Level," 14th ICABR Conference, June 16-18, 2010, Ravello, Italy 188113, International Consortium on Applied Bioeconomy Research (ICABR).

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