IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/agecon/v37y2007i2-3p293-303.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The impact of coffee price changes on rural households in Uganda

Author

Listed:
  • Maurizio Bussolo
  • Olivier Godart
  • Jann Lay
  • Rainer Thiele

Abstract

Employing household survey data covering the periods 1992-1993, 1995-1996, and 1999-2000, this article shows for the case of Uganda that a coffee market liberalization followed by a price boom was associated with substantial reductions in poverty, which could even be sustained when prices went down again. Coffee is not planted by the richest farmers and the gains from higher coffee prices accrued to poorer and richer coffee farmers alike. Nor were poorer farmers hurt disproportionately when prices fell. In addition, we find strong spillovers from coffee production to other agriculture, which tends to favor the poor, and to nonagricultural activities. These multiplier effects are concentrated in coffee regions. In an economic environment characterized by a booming agricultural sector, coffee farmers were able to accommodate the negative price shock, in particular through agricultural diversification. General agricultural growth also cushioned possible negative multiplier effects in coffee regions. Overall, the case of coffee in Uganda thus lends support to the view that agricultural trade liberalization is beneficial for the poor. Copyright 2007 International Association of Agricultural Economists.

Suggested Citation

  • Maurizio Bussolo & Olivier Godart & Jann Lay & Rainer Thiele, 2007. "The impact of coffee price changes on rural households in Uganda," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 37(2-3), pages 293-303, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:agecon:v:37:y:2007:i:2-3:p:293-303
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1574-0862.2007.00275.x
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Dorosh, Paul A. & El-Said, Moataz & Lofgren, Hans, 2003. "Technical Change, Market Incentives And Rural Incomes: A Cge Analysis Of Uganda'S Agriculture," 2003 Annual Meeting, August 16-22, 2003, Durban, South Africa 25846, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Krivonos, Ekaterina, 2004. "The impact of coffee market reforms on producer prices and price transmission," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3358, The World Bank.
    3. Ritva Reinikka & Paul Collier, 2001. "Uganda's Recovery : The Role of Farms, Firms, and Government," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13850, November.
    4. Marcel Fafchamps & Ruth Vargas Hill & Aliziki Kaudha & Robert Waggwa Nsibirwa, 2003. "The transmission of international commodity prices to domestic producers," CSAE Working Paper Series 2003-14, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    5. Klaus Deininger & John Okidi, 2003. "Growth and Poverty Reduction in Uganda, 1999-2000: Panel Data Evidence," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 21, pages 481-509, July.
    6. Maurizio Bussolo & Olivier Godart & Jann Lay & Rainer Thiele, 2007. "The impact of coffee price changes on rural households in Uganda," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 37(2-3), pages 293-303, September.
    7. Simon Appleton, 2003. "Regional or National Poverty Lines? The Case of Uganda in the 1990s," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 12(4), pages 598-624, December.
    8. Bussolo, Maurizio & Godart, Olivier & Lay, Jann & Thiele, Rainer, 2006. "The impact of commodity price changes on rural households : the case of coffee in Uganda," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4088, The World Bank.
    9. L. ALAN WINTERS & NEIL McCULLOCH & ANDREW McKAY, 2015. "Trade Liberalization and Poverty: The Evidence So Far," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: Non-Tariff Barriers, Regionalism and Poverty Essays in Applied International Trade Analysis, chapter 14, pages 271-314 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    10. Marcel Fafchamps & Ruth Vargas Hill, 2005. "Selling at the Farmgate or Traveling to Market," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 87(3), pages 717-734.
    11. Belshaw, Deryke & Lawrence, Peter & Hubbard, Michael, 1999. "Agricultural Tradables and Economic Recovery in Uganda: The Limitations of Structural Adjustment in Practice," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 673-690, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Maurizio Bussolo & Olivier Godart & Jann Lay & Rainer Thiele, 2007. "The impact of coffee price changes on rural households in Uganda," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 37(2-3), pages 293-303, September.
    2. Stephan Klasen & Jan Priebe & Robert Rudolf, 2013. "Cash crop choice and income dynamics in rural areas: evidence for post-crisis Indonesia," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 44(3), pages 349-364, May.
    3. Abdoul Murekezi & Songqing Jin & Scott Loveridge, 2014. "Have coffee producers benefited from the new domestic cherry market? Evidence using panel data from Rwanda," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 45(4), pages 489-500, July.
    4. Murekezi, Abdoul Karim & Loveridge, Scott, 2009. "Have coffee reforms and coffee supply chains affected farmers' income? The case of coffee growers in Rwanda," 2009 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, 2009, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 49597, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:agecon:v:37:y:2007:i:2-3:p:293-303. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley Content Delivery) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/iaaeeea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.