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An Economic Analysis of Ugandan Agricultural Constraints

Author

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  • Komarek, Adam M.
  • Ahmadi-Esfahani, Fredoun Z.

Abstract

Transaction costs and poor asset endowments appear to be major impediments to small scale agricultural development in Uganda. Reasons for the lack of commercialisation of agriculture, and the barriers to increasing the value of banana crop sales and banana production are the focus of this paper. Using agricultural household economics theory, an empirical analysis based on the Heckman model is unertaken. Data collected through a primary farm survey in three different regions of Uganda form the crux of the analysis. Preliminary findings indicate that transaction costs and production constraints are hindering development, thereby hampering poverty alleviation efforts.

Suggested Citation

  • Komarek, Adam M. & Ahmadi-Esfahani, Fredoun Z., 2006. "An Economic Analysis of Ugandan Agricultural Constraints," 2006 Conference (50th), February 8-10, 2006, Sydney, Australia 139796, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aare06:139796
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/139796
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Marcel Fafchamps & Ruth Vargas Hill, 2005. "Selling at the Farmgate or Traveling to Market," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 87(3), pages 717-734.
    2. Ritva Reinikka & Paul Collier, 2001. "Uganda's Recovery : The Role of Farms, Firms, and Government," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13850.
    3. Pender, John & Ssewanyana, Sarah & Edward, Kato & Nkonya, Ephraim M., 2004. "Linkages between poverty and land management in rural Uganda: evidence from the Uganda National Household Survey, 1999/00," EPTD discussion papers 122, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Nigel Key & Elisabeth Sadoulet & Alain De Janvry, 2000. "Transactions Costs and Agricultural Household Supply Response," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(2), pages 245-259.
    5. Nkonya, Ephraim M. & Pender, John & Kaizzi, Crammer & Edward, Kato & Mugarura, Samuel, 2005. "Policy options for increasing crop productivity and reducing soil nutrient depletion and poverty in Uganda:," EPTD discussion papers 134, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. CÈline Dutilly-Diane & Elisabeth Sadoulet & Alain de Janvry, 2003. "Household Behaviour under Market Failures: How Natural Resource Management in Agriculture Promotes Livestock Production in the Sahel," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 12(3), pages 343-370, September.
    7. Steven Were Omamo, 1998. "Farm-to-market transaction costs and specialisation in small-scale agriculture: Explorations with a non-separable household model," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(2), pages 152-163.
    8. Heltberg, R. & Tarp, F., 2002. "Agricultural supply response and poverty in Mozambique," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 103-124, April.
    9. Pender, John & Nkonya, Ephraim & Jagger, Pamela & Sserunkuuma, Dick & Ssali, Henry, 2004. "Strategies to increase agricultural productivity and reduce land degradation: evidence from Uganda," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 31(2-3), pages 181-195, December.
    10. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", pages 129-137.
    11. Jayne, T S, 1994. "Do High Food Marketing Costs Constrain Cash Crop Production? Evidence from Zimbabwe," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 42(2), pages 387-402, January.
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