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Restructuring Uganda's coffee industry : why going back to the basics matters

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  • Baffes, John

Abstract

After experiencing a boom during the mid-1990s, the performance of Uganda's coffee industry has been disappointing. Most existing analyses see the sector's problems as quality deterioration, poor marketing position in the global market, weak regulatory framework, and poor infrastructure. Recommendations range from setting up a coffee auction to increasing the share of specialty coffees. This paper concludes that such advice has been largely inconsistent with the stylized facts of the Ugandan coffee industry. It argues that the coffee wilt disease and the effectiveness of the coffee replanting program are the two key issues on which policymakers and the donor community should focus their activities and allocate their resources.

Suggested Citation

  • Baffes, John, 2006. "Restructuring Uganda's coffee industry : why going back to the basics matters," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4020, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:4020
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kappel, Robert & Lay, Jann & Steiner, Susan, 2005. "Uganda: No more pro-poor growth?," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Kiel 2005 31, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
    2. Krivonos, Ekaterina, 2004. "The impact of coffee market reforms on producer prices and price transmission," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3358, The World Bank.
    3. Kilian, Bernard & Jones, Connie & Pratt, Lawrence & Villalobos, Andres, 2006. "Is sustainable agriculture a viable strategy to improve farm income in Central America? A case study on coffee," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 59(3), pages 322-330, March.
    4. John Baffes, 2004. "Tanzania's Cotton Sector: Reforms, Constraints and Challenges," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 22(1), pages 75-96, January.
    5. Paul Collier, 1997. "The Trade Policy Review of Uganda," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(5), pages 649-664, August.
    6. repec:zbw:ifwkie:3715 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Akiyama, Takamasa & Baffes, John & Larson, Donald F. & Varangis, Panos, 2003. "Commodity market reform in Africa: some recent experience," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 83-115, March.
    8. John Baffes, 2005. "Tanzania's coffee sector: constraints and challenges," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(1), pages 21-43.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. World Bank, 2011. "Ugandan Coffee Supply Chain Risk Assessment," World Bank Other Operational Studies 27386, The World Bank.
    2. Chiputwa, Brian & Spielman, David J. & Qaim, Matin, 2015. "Food Standards, Certification, and Poverty among Coffee Farmers in Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 400-412.
    3. repec:bla:jageco:v:68:y:2017:i:3:p:727-748 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Golan, Jennifer & Lay, Jann, 2008. "More coffee, more cigarettes? Coffee market liberalisation, gender, and bargaining in Uganda," Kiel Working Papers 1402, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    5. Latynskiy, Evgeny & Berger, Thomas, 2016. "Networks of Rural Producer Organizations in Uganda: What Can be Done to Make Them Work Better?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 572-586.
    6. Lay, Jann & Golan, Jennifer, 2009. "The Impact of Agricultural Market Liberalisation from a Gender Perspective: Evidence from Uganda," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Frankfurt a.M. 2009 20, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
    7. Latynskiy, Evgeny & Berger, Thomas, 2015. "UTZ certification for groups of smallholder coffee farmers: Hype of hope?," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 229069, International Association of Agricultural Economists.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Crops&Crop Management Systems; Markets and Market Access; Access to Markets; Water and Industry; Economic Theory&Research;

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