IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ags/jlaare/31077.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Storage Technology And The Environment

Author

Listed:
  • Lichtenberg, Erik
  • Zilberman, David

Abstract

A dynamic framework is presented for analyzing regulations affecting the use of spoilage-reducing inputs with potential negative environmental effects, such as pesticides, growth regulators, chemical preservatives, and irradiation. Such regulations change intertemporal consumption patterns as well as total output. Consumers may benefit from restrictions on storage technology, giving them a reason to support regulation even when it may not be warranted to correct environmental externalities. Static analyses do not take into account changes in intertemporal consumption, and thus may give misleading depictions of the effects of imposing new regulations. Implications of the framework for development and trade policy are discussed, as are extensions to cases of uncertainty and multiple time periods.

Suggested Citation

  • Lichtenberg, Erik & Zilberman, David, 2002. "Storage Technology And The Environment," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 27(01), July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jlaare:31077
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/31077
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Foster, William E. & Babcock, Bruce A., 1991. "Producer Welfare Consequences of Regulating Chemical Residues on Agricultural Crops: Maleic Hydrazide and Flue Cured Tobacco," Staff General Research Papers Archive 10590, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    2. Williams,Jeffrey C. & Wright,Brian D., 2005. "Storage and Commodity Markets," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521023399, May.
    3. Wright, Brian D & Williams, Jeffrey C, 1982. "The Economic Role of Commodity Storage," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 92(367), pages 596-614, September.
    4. Brian D. Wright & Jeffrey C. Williams, 1984. "The Welfare Effects of the Introduction of Storage," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 99(1), pages 169-192.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. David Zilberman & Eunice Kim & Sam Kirschner & Scott Kaplan & Jeanne Reeves, 2013. "Technology and the future bioeconomy," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 44(s1), pages 95-102, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Environmental Economics and Policy;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:jlaare:31077. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/waeaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.