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The Effects Of U.S. Meat Packing And Livestock Production Technologies On Marketing Margins And Prices

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  • Brester, Gary W.
  • Marsh, John M.

Abstract

Real livestock prices and farm-wholesale marketing margins have steadily declined over the past 20 years. Studies examining the causes of these declines have generally failed to account directly for technological change in livestock production and red meat slaughtering. We estimate reduced-form models for beef and pork farm-wholesale marketing margins and cattle and hog prices that include specific measures of technological change. Empirical results indicate cost savings generated by improved meat packing technologies have reduced real margins and positively influenced real cattle and hog prices. However, technological change embodied in cattle production weights has led to substantial declines in real slaughter cattle prices. Nonetheless, the net effect of improved meat packing technology has been to increase cattle price by $1.75/cwt and reduce the farm-wholesale beef marketing margin by 22.8 cents/lb.

Suggested Citation

  • Brester, Gary W. & Marsh, John M., 2001. "The Effects Of U.S. Meat Packing And Livestock Production Technologies On Marketing Margins And Prices," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 26(02), December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jlaare:31052
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Rosen, Sherwin & Murphy, Kevin M & Scheinkman, Jose A, 1994. "Cattle Cycles," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(3), pages 468-492, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Dai, Jiawu & Li, Xun & Wang, Xiuqing & Yu, Qiushuo & Mao, Xiaojie, 2015. "Food Scares, Market Power and Farm-Retail Price Spread: The Case of Pork Market in China," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 205121, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.
    2. Oral Capps Jr. & Sergio Colinā€Castillo & Manuel A. Hernandez, 2013. "Do Marketing Margins Change with Food Scares? Examining the Effects of Food Recalls and Disease Outbreaks in the U.S. Red Meat Industry," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(4), pages 426-454, September.

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    Keywords

    Demand and Price Analysis;

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