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The Inverse Lewbel Demand System


  • Eales, James S.


A new model of consumer preferences is introduced. It is appropriate for modeling perishable commodities which are produced with a lag, where it is reasonable to assume the market-level quantities are fixed by previously made production decisions. The inverse Lewbel system, as it is called, is a flexible nonlinear system of share equations, which nests two other inverse demand systems, the direct translog and the inverse AIDS. Thus, the inverse Lewbel may be employed to test whether these more restrictive preference structures are appropriate. In an application to quarterly U.S. meat consumption, the more restrictive structures are rejected.

Suggested Citation

  • Eales, James S., 1994. "The Inverse Lewbel Demand System," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 19(01), July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jlaare:31227

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Lewbel, Arthur, 1989. "Nesting the AIDS and Translog Demand System," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 30(2), pages 349-356, May.
    2. Anderson, G J & Blundell, R W, 1982. "Estimation and Hypothesis Testing in Dynamic Singular Equation Systems," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(6), pages 1559-1571, November.
    3. Alston, Julian M. & Chalfant, James A., 1991. "Can We Take The Con Out Of Meat Demand Studies?," Western Journal of Agricultural Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 16(01), July.
    4. Hicks, J. R., 1986. "A Revision of Demand Theory," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198285502, June.
    5. Deaton, Angus, 1986. "Demand analysis," Handbook of Econometrics,in: Z. Griliches† & M. D. Intriligator (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 30, pages 1767-1839 Elsevier.
    6. Dale W. Jorgenson & Lawrence J. Lau, 1975. "The Structure of Consumer Preferences," NBER Chapters,in: Annals of Economic and Social Measurement, Volume 4, number 1, pages 49-101 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. LaFrance, Jeffrey T., 1991. "When Is Expenditure "Exogenous" In Separable Demand Models?," Western Journal of Agricultural Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 16(01), July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hilmer, Christiana E. & Holt, Matthew T., 2005. "Estimating Indirect Production Functions with a More General Specification: An Application of the Lewbel Model," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 37(03), December.
    2. Robert H. Beach & Matthew T. Holt, 2001. "Incorporating Quadratic Scale Curves in Inverse Demand Systems," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(1), pages 230-245.
    3. Holt, Matthew T., 2002. "Inverse demand systems and choice of functional form," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 117-142, January.
    4. Eales, James S. & Hyde, Jeffrey & Schrader, Lee F., 1998. "A Note On Dealing With Poultry In Demand Analysis," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 23(02), December.
    5. Marsh, John M. & Brester, Gary W., 1999. "Technological Change In The U.S. Beef And Pork Sectors: Impacts On Farm-Wholesale Marketing Margins And Livestock Prices," Trade Research Center Research Discussion Papers 29242, Montana State University, Department of Agricultural Economics and Economics.
    6. Brester, Gary W. & Marsh, John M., 2001. "The Effects Of U.S. Meat Packing And Livestock Production Technologies On Marketing Margins And Prices," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 26(02), December.

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