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Estimating the Spatially Varying Responses of Corn Yields toWeather Variations using GeographicallyWeighted Panel Regression

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  • Cai, Ruohong
  • Yu, Danlin
  • Oppenheimer, Michael

Abstract

Researchers have extensively studied crop yield response to weather variations, while only a limited number of studies have attempted to identify spatial heterogeneity in this relationship. We explore spatial heterogeneity in corn yield response to weather by combining geographically weighted regression and panel regression. We find that temperature tends to have negative effects on U.S. corn yields in warmer regions and positive effects in cooler regions, with spatial heterogeneity at a fine scale. The spatial pattern of precipitation effects is more complicated. A further analysis shows that precipitation effects are sensitive to the existence of irrigation systems.

Suggested Citation

  • Cai, Ruohong & Yu, Danlin & Oppenheimer, Michael, 2014. "Estimating the Spatially Varying Responses of Corn Yields toWeather Variations using GeographicallyWeighted Panel Regression," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 39(2), pages 1-23.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jlaare:186586
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.186586
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/186586/files/JARE_Aug2014__6_Cai_pp230-252.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dan-Lin Yu, 2006. "Spatially varying development mechanisms in the Greater Beijing Area: a geographically weighted regression investigation," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 40(1), pages 173-190, March.
    2. Cho, Seong-Hoon & Bowker, James Michael & Park, William M., 2006. "Measuring the Contribution of Water and Green Space Amenities to Housing Values: An Application and Comparison of Spatially Weighted Hedonic Models," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 31(3), pages 1-23, December.
    3. Tobey, James A. & Reilly, John M. & Kane, Sally, 1992. "Economic Implications Of Global Climate Change For World Agriculture," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 17(1), pages 1-10, July.
    4. Partridge, Mark D. & Rickman, Dan S., 2007. "Persistent Pockets of Extreme American Poverty and Job Growth: Is There a Place-Based Policy Role?," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 32(1), pages 1-24, April.
    5. Olivier DeschĂȘnes & Michael Greenstone, 2007. "The Economic Impacts of Climate Change: Evidence from Agricultural Output and Random Fluctuations in Weather," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(1), pages 354-385, March.
    6. Bruce A. McCarl & Xavier Villavicencio & Ximing Wu, 2008. "Climate Change and Future Analysis: Is Stationarity Dying?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 90(5), pages 1241-1247.
    7. Elbakidze, Levan & Lu, Liang & Eigenbrode, Sanford, 2011. "Evaluating Vector-Virus-Yield Interactions for Peas and Lentils under Climatic Variability: A Limited Dependent Variable Analysis," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 36(3), pages 1-17.
    8. Dixon, Bruce L. & Hollinger, Steven E. & Garcia, Philip & Tirupattur, Viswanath, 1994. "Estimating Corn Yield Response Models To Predict Impacts Of Climate Change," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 19(1), pages 1-11, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Giri, Anil & Johnson, Bruce & Supalla, Raymond, 2016. "An Alternative Approach to Measuring Drought in the Corn Belt," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, Boston, Massachusetts 235628, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    2. Aditya Kusuma & Bethanna Jackson & Ilan Noy, 2018. "A viable and cost-effective weather index insurance for rice in Indonesia," The Geneva Risk and Insurance Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Association for the Study of Insurance Economics (The Geneva Association), vol. 43(2), pages 186-218, September.
    3. Eric J Belasco & Joseph Cooper & Vincent H Smith, 2020. "The Development of a Weather‐based Crop Disaster Program," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 102(1), pages 240-258, January.
    4. Yu, Danlin & Murakami, Daisuke & Zhang, Yaojun & Wu, Xiwei & Li, Ding & Wang, Xiaoxi & Li, Guangdong, 2020. "Investigating high-speed rail construction's support to county level regional development in China: An eigenvector based spatial filtering panel data analysis," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 21-37.

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