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Australia Fresh fruits and vegetables: Why do so many of them remain unbranded?

  • Pearson, David
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    Most fresh fruits and vegetables are unbranded. However, buyers are assisted with brands when purchasing most other grocery products. Brands have the potential to be of value to buyers and to the organisations that own them. However, research has shown that brands are only valuable to buyers when the attribute being sought fluctuates and is hidden from them at the time of purchase. Such as tastes with respect to apples. On this basis, for example, brands are relevant for apples, oranges, rockmelons and grapes, but not for potatoes, onions or mushrooms. However, it may not even be possible to develop successful brands with products for which they are relevant. This is due to the difficulty of reducing fluctuations in the attributes sought and hence being able to present a consistent product to the buyer as well as the difficulty of the organisation investing in the brand receiving some benefit. Thus, many fresh fruit and vegetable products are likely to remain unbranded.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/132540
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    Article provided by University of Melbourne, Melbourne School of Land and Environment in its journal Australasian Agribusiness Review.

    Volume (Year): 11 (2003)
    Issue (Month): ()
    Pages:

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    Handle: RePEc:ags:auagre:132540
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.agrifood.info/review/

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    1. Caswell, Julie A. & Mojduszka, Eliza M., 1996. "Using Informational Labeling To Influence The Market For Quality In Food Products," Working Papers 25989, Regional Research Project NE-165 Private Strategies, Public Policies, and Food System Performance.
    2. Darby, Michael R & Karni, Edi, 1973. "Free Competition and the Optimal Amount of Fraud," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(1), pages 67-88, April.
    3. Akerlof, George A, 1970. "The Market for 'Lemons': Quality Uncertainty and the Market Mechanism," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 84(3), pages 488-500, August.
    4. Nicholas E. Piggott & Victor E. Wright, 1992. "From Consumer Choice Process To Aggregate Analysis: Marketing Insights For Models Of Meat Demand," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 36(3), pages 233-248, December.
    5. Piggott, Nicholas E. & Wright, Vic, 1992. "From Consumer Choice Process To Aggregate Analysis: Marketing Insights For Models Of Meat Demand," Australian Journal of Agricultural Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 36(03), December.
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