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Oil and the U.S. Macroeconomy: A Reinvestigation Using Rolling Impulse Responses

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  • Marc Gronwald

Abstract

This paper investigates the role of extreme oil price increases in empirical studies of the macroeconomics of oil prices. The innovative approach of rolling impulse responses is applied and data on both the aggregate and the industry-level is considered. The results show that the first oil crisis drives long-run results and superimposes both subsample and industry-specifics. Furthermore, there is evidence that the non-occurrence of large oil shocks after the mid1980s is an important explanation for the Great Moderation.

Suggested Citation

  • Marc Gronwald, 2012. "Oil and the U.S. Macroeconomy: A Reinvestigation Using Rolling Impulse Responses," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4).
  • Handle: RePEc:aen:journl:ej33-4-07
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jozef Baruník, Evzen Kocenda and Lukáa Vácha, 2015. "Volatility Spillovers Across Petroleum Markets," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3).
    2. Bashar, Omar H.M.N. & Wadud, I.K.M. Mokhtarul & Ali Ahmed, Huson Joher, 2013. "Oil price uncertainty, monetary policy and the macroeconomy: The Canadian perspective," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 249-259.
    3. repec:aen:journl:ej38-5-huntington is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Hillard G. Huntington, 2017. "The Historical Roots of U.S. Energy Price Shocks," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 5).
    5. Huntington, Hillard, 2016. "The Historical “Roots” of U.S. Energy Price Shocks: Supplemental Results," MPRA Paper 74701, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Luiggi Donayre & Neil A. Wilmot, 2016. "The Asymmetric Effects of Oil Price Shocks on the Canadian Economy," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 6(2), pages 167-182.
    7. repec:ris:apltrx:0318 is not listed on IDEAS

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    JEL classification:

    • F0 - International Economics - - General

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