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Prospects in the Academic Labor Market for Economists

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  • Ronald G. Ehrenberg

Abstract

This paper discussed what the academic labor market for economists is likely to look like in the years ahead. After tracing out trends in PhD production of new economists, including the increasing share of new PhDs who are foreign residents, it presents new evidence on the growing use of part-time and full-time non tenure-track faculty in U.S. economics departments, the growing salary differentials between economists employed at private and public doctoral universities, and how economists' salaries have changed relative to those of faculty in other disciplines.

Suggested Citation

  • Ronald G. Ehrenberg, 2004. "Prospects in the Academic Labor Market for Economists," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 18(2), pages 227-238, Spring.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:18:y:2004:i:2:p:227-238
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/0895330041371312
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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/0895330041371312
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. George J. Borjas, 2000. "Foreign-Born Teaching Assistants and the Academic Performance of Undergraduates," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 355-359, May.
    2. Eric Bettinger & Bridget Terry Long, 2004. "Do College Instructors Matter? The Effects of Adjuncts and Graduate Assistants on Students' Interests and Success," NBER Working Papers 10370, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Günther G. Schulze & Susanne Warning & Christian Wiermann, 2008. "What and How Long Does It Take to Get Tenure? The Case of Economics and Business Administration in Austria, Germany and Switzerland," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 9, pages 473-505, November.
    2. Dan Ben-David, 2009. "Soaring Minds: The Flight Of Israel'S Economists," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 27(3), pages 363-379, July.
    3. Bruce A. Weinberg & Belton M. Fleisher & Masanori Hashimoto, 2007. "Evaluating Methods for Evaluating Instruction: The Case of Higher Education," NBER Working Papers 12844, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Ehrenberg, Ronald G. & McGraw, Marquise & Mrdjenovic, Jesenka, 2006. "Why do field differentials in average faculty salaries vary across universities?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 241-248, June.
    5. Robert E. Martin, 2011. "The College Cost Disease," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14179.
    6. Asali, Muhammad, 2018. "A Tale of Two Tracks," GLO Discussion Paper Series 198, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    7. Sam Allgood & William B. Walstad & John J. Siegfried, 2015. "Research on Teaching Economics to Undergraduates," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 53(2), pages 285-325, June.
    8. William R. Johnson & Sarah Turner, 2009. "Faculty without Students: Resource Allocation in Higher Education," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 23(2), pages 169-189, Spring.
    9. Ronald G. Ehrenberg, 2005. "Involving Undergraduates in Research To Encourage Them To Undertake Ph.D. Study in Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 184-188, May.
    10. Brooke Helppie McFall & Marta Murray-Close & Robert J. Willis & Uniko Chen, 2014. "Is it all worth it? The experiences of new PhDs on the job market, 2007-2010," NBER Working Papers 20654, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Asali, Muhammad, 2018. "A Tale of Two Academic Tracks," IZA Discussion Papers 11423, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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