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Gender ratios at top PhD programs in economics

  • Galina Hale
  • Tali Regev

Analyzing university faculty and graduate student data for the top-ten U.S. economics departments between 1987 and 2007, we find that there are persistent differences in gender composition for both faculty and graduate students across institutions and that the share of female faculty and the share of women in the entering PhD class are positively correlated. We find, using instrumental variables analysis, robust evidence that this correlation is driven by the causal effect of the female faculty share on the gender composition of the entering PhD class. This result provides an explanation for persistent underrepresentation of women in economics, as well as for persistent segregation of women across academic fields.

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Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco in its series Working Paper Series with number 2011-19.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedfwp:2011-19
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  10. Christiana E. Hilmer & Michael J. Hilmer, 2007. "On the Relationship between the Student-Advisor Match and Early Career Research Productivity for Agricultural and Resource Economics Ph.D.s," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 89(1), pages 162-175.
  11. Karen E. Dynan & Cecilia Elena Rouse, 1997. "The Underrepresentation of Women in Economics: A Study of Undergraduate Economics Students," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(4), pages 350-368, December.
  12. Larry D. Singell & John M. McDowell & James P. Ziliak, 1999. "Cracks in the Glass Ceiling: Gender and Promotion in the Economics Profession," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 392-396, May.
  13. Natalia Zinovyeva & Manuel F. Bagues, 2010. "Does gender matter for academic promotion? Evidence from a randomized natural experiment," Working Papers 2010-15, FEDEA.
  14. Francine D. Blau & Janet M. Currie & Rachel T.A. Croson & Donna K. Ginther, 2010. "Can Mentoring Help Female Assistant Professors? Interim Results from a Randomized Trial," NBER Working Papers 15707, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Robst, John & Keil, Jack & Russo, Dean, 1998. "The effect of gender composition of faculty on student retention," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 429-439, October.
  16. Florian Hoffman & Philip Oreopoulos, 2007. "A Professor Like Me: The Influence of Instructor Gender on College Achievement," NBER Working Papers 13182, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  17. Gregory Attiyeh & Richard Attiyeh, 1997. "Testing for Bias in Graduate School Admissions," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 32(3), pages 524-548.
  18. Pamela S. Tolbert & Alice Andrews & Tal Simons & Jaehoon Rhee, 1995. "The effects of gender composition in academic departments on faculty turnover," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 48(3), pages 562-579, April.
  19. Wendy A. Stock & John J. Siegfried & T. Aldrich Finegan, 2011. "Completion Rates and Time-to-Degree in Economics PhD Programs (with comments by David Colander, N. Gregory Mankiw, Melissa P. McInerney, James M. Poterba)," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(3), pages 176-88, May.
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