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The Rise of the Dollar and Fall of the Euro as International Currencies

Author

Listed:
  • Matteo Maggiori
  • Brent Neiman
  • Jesse Schreger

Abstract

International currencies play important roles as foreign exchange reserves but are also most frequently used to denominate corporate and government bonds, bank loans, and import and export invoices. These currencies offer unrivaled liquidity, constituting large shares of the volume on global foreign exchange markets, and are commonly chosen as the anchors targeted by countries with pegged or managed exchange rate regimes. We provide evidence suggesting a recent rise in the use of the dollar, and fall of the use of the euro, with similar patterns manifesting across all these aspects of international currency use.

Suggested Citation

  • Matteo Maggiori & Brent Neiman & Jesse Schreger, 2019. "The Rise of the Dollar and Fall of the Euro as International Currencies," AEA Papers and Proceedings, American Economic Association, vol. 109, pages 521-526, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:apandp:v:109:y:2019:p:521-26
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/pandp.20191007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kamps, Annette, 2006. "The euro as invoicing currency in international trade," Working Paper Series 665, European Central Bank.
    2. Ricardo J. Caballero & Emmanuel Farhi & Pierre-Olivier Gourinchas, 2008. "An Equilibrium Model of "Global Imbalances" and Low Interest Rates," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(1), pages 358-393, March.
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    5. Emmanuel Farhi & Matteo Maggiori, 2018. "A Model of the International Monetary System," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 133(1), pages 295-355.
    6. Ethan Ilzetzki & Carmen M Reinhart & Kenneth S Rogoff, 2019. "Exchange Arrangements Entering the Twenty-First Century: Which Anchor will Hold?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 134(2), pages 599-646.
    7. Matteo Maggiori & Brent Neiman & Jesse Schreger, 2020. "International Currencies and Capital Allocation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 128(6), pages 2019-2066.
    8. Matteo Maggiori, 2017. "Financial Intermediation, International Risk Sharing, and Reserve Currencies," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(10), pages 3038-3071, October.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Coman, Andra & Lloyd, Simon, 2019. "In the face of spillovers: prudential policies in emerging economies," Bank of England working papers 828, Bank of England.
    2. Yining Geng, 2020. "Impact of Family Planning Policy on Gender Inequality: Evidence from China," Working Papers 202009, University of Liverpool, Department of Economics.
    3. Ilzetzki, Ethan & Reinhart, Carmen M. & Rogoff, Kenneth, 2020. "Why is the Euro Punching Below its Weight," CEPR Discussion Papers 14315, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Barry Eichengreen, 2019. "Two Views of the International Monetary System," Intereconomics: Review of European Economic Policy, Springer;ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics;Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), vol. 54(4), pages 233-236, July.
    5. Coppola, Antonio & Maggiori, Matteo & Neiman, Brent & Schreger, Jesse, 2020. "Redrawing the Map of Global Capital Flows: The Role of Cross-Border Financing and Tax Havens," CEPR Discussion Papers 14508, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Giancarlo Corsetti & Meredith Crowley & Lu Han, 2020. "Invoicing and Pricing-to-market: Evidence on international pricing by UK exporters," Working Papers 202007, University of Liverpool, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E42 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Monetary Sytsems; Standards; Regimes; Government and the Monetary System
    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • F33 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Monetary Arrangements and Institutions

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