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Citations for "Trade adjustment and the composition of trade"

by Christopher J. Erceg & Luca Guerrieri & Christopher J. Gust

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  1. Schmidt, Sebastian & Wieland, Volker, 2012. "The new keynesian approach to dynamic general equilibrium modeling: Models, methods, and macroeconomic policy evaluation," IMFS Working Paper Series 52, Goethe University Frankfurt, Institute for Monetary and Financial Stability (IMFS).
  2. Takamatsu, Satoko, 2010. "Openness and interest rates: An analysis using the MIUF model and transaction cost model of money," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 295-303, April.
  3. Jian Wang & Charles Engel, 2008. "International Trade in Durable Goods: Understanding Volatility, Cyclicality, and Elasticities," 2008 Meeting Papers 210, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  4. Punnoose Jacob & Gert Peersman, 2012. "Dissecting the dynamics of the US trade balance in an estimated equilibrium model," Working Paper Research 226, National Bank of Belgium.
  5. Shin-ichi Fukuda & Yoshifumi Kon, 2007. "Liquidity Risk Aversion, Debt Maturity, and Current Account Surpluses: A Theory and Evidence from East Asia," NBER Working Papers 13004, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Bodenstein, Martin & Erceg, Christopher J. & Guerrieri, Luca, 2011. "Oil shocks and external adjustment," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(2), pages 168-184, March.
  7. Bollino, Carlo Andrea, 2007. "Oil prices and the U.S. trade deficit," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 729-738.
  8. Charles Engel & Jian Wang, 2007. "International trade in durable goods: understanding volatility, cyclicality, and elastics," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 03, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  9. Marcel Fratzscher & Luciana Juvenal & Lucio Sarno, 2008. "Asset prices, exchange rates and the current account," Working Papers 2008-031, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  10. Wieland, Volker & Cwik, Tobias J. & Müller, Gernot J. & Schmidt, Sebastian & Wolters, Maik H., 2012. "A new comparative approach to macroeconomic modeling and policy analysis," CFS Working Paper Series 2012/03, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
  11. Philip Ulrich Sauré, 2015. "Time-intensive R&D and unbalanced trade," Working Papers 2015-11, Swiss National Bank.
  12. Christopher J. Gust & Sylvain Leduc & Nathan Sheets, 2008. "The adjustment of global external balances: does partial exchange rate pass-through to trade prices matter?," Working Paper Series 2008-16, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  13. Martin Bodenstein & Christopher J. Erceg & Luca Guerrieri, 2009. "The effects of foreign shocks when interest rates are at zero," International Finance Discussion Papers 983, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  14. Taylor, John B. & Wieland, Volker, 2010. "Surprising comparative properties of monetary models: Results from a new model database," Working Paper Series 1261, European Central Bank.
  15. Dimitra Petropoulou & Kwok Tong Soo, 2011. "Product Durability and Trade Volatility," Working Paper Series 2811, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.
  16. Volker Wieland, 2012. "Model comparison and robustness: a proposal for policy analysis after the financial crisis," Chapters, in: What’s Right with Macroeconomics?, chapter 2, pages 33-67 Edward Elgar Publishing.
  17. Caporale, Guglielmo Maria & Donadelli, Michael & Varani, Alessia, 2015. "International capital markets structure, preferences and puzzles: A “US–China World”," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 85-99.
  18. Mittnik, Stefan & Semmler, Willi, 2012. "Regime dependence of the fiscal multiplier," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 83(3), pages 502-522.
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