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Death to the Cobb-Douglas Production Function

Author

Listed:
  • Sebastian Gechert
  • Thomas Havranek
  • Zuzana Irsova
  • Dominika Kolcunova

Abstract

We show that the large elasticity of substitution between capital and labor estimated in the literature on average, 0.9, can be explained by three factors: publication bias, use of aggregated data, and omission of the first-order condition for capital. The mean elasticity conditional on the absence of publication bias, disaggregated data, and inclusion of information from the first-order condition for capital is 0.3. To obtain this result, we collect 3,186 estimates of the elasticity reported in 121 studies, codify 71 variables that reflect the context in which researchers produce their estimates, and address model uncertainty by Bayesian and frequentist model averaging. We employ nonlinear techniques to correct for publication bias, which is responsible for at least half of the overall reduction in the mean elasticity from 0.9 to 0.3. The weight of evidence accumulated in the empirical literature emphatically rejects the Cobb-Douglas specification.

Suggested Citation

  • Sebastian Gechert & Thomas Havranek & Zuzana Irsova & Dominika Kolcunova, 2019. "Death to the Cobb-Douglas Production Function," FMM Working Paper 51-2019, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:imk:fmmpap:51-2019
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Tyler Atkinson & Michael D. Plante & Alexander W. Richter & Nathaniel A. Throckmorton, 2020. "Complementarity and Macroeconomic Uncertainty," Working Papers 2009, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, revised 31 Mar 2020.
    2. Jan Behringer, 2019. "Factor shares and the rise in corporate net lending," IMK Working Paper 202-2019, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    3. Kvarven, Amanda & Strømland, Eirik & Johannesson, Magnus, 2019. "Identification of and Correction for Publication Bias: Comment," MetaArXiv dh87m, Center for Open Science.
    4. Tomáš Havránek & T. D. Stanley & Hristos Doucouliagos & Pedro Bom & Jerome Geyer‐Klingeberg & Ichiro Iwasaki & W. Robert Reed & Katja Rost & R. C. M. van Aert, 2020. "Reporting Guidelines For Meta‐Analysis In Economics," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(3), pages 469-475, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Elasticity of substitution; capital; labor; publication bias; model uncertainty;

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • E23 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Production
    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology

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