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Global Spillovers of a China Hard Landing

Author

Listed:
  • Shaghil Ahmed
  • Ricardo Correa
  • Daniel A. Dias
  • Nils Gornemann
  • Jasper Hoek
  • Anil K. Jain
  • Edith X. Liu
  • Anna Wong

Abstract

China?s economy has become larger and more interconnected with the rest of the world, thus raising the possibility that acute financial stress in China may lead to global financial instability. This paper analyzes the potential spillovers of such an event to the rest of the world with three methodologies: a VAR, an event study, and a DSGE model. We find the sentiment channel to be the primary spillover channel to the United States, affecting global risk aversion and asset prices such as equity prices and the dollar, in addition to modest real effects through the trade channel. In comparison, the combined financial and real effects to other advanced and emerging market economies, especially net commodity exporters, would be more consequential due to their larger direct exposure to China and more limited scope of monetary policy to respond to shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Shaghil Ahmed & Ricardo Correa & Daniel A. Dias & Nils Gornemann & Jasper Hoek & Anil K. Jain & Edith X. Liu & Anna Wong, 2019. "Global Spillovers of a China Hard Landing," International Finance Discussion Papers 1260, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgif:1260
    DOI: 10.17016/IFDP.2019.1260
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    File URL: https://www.federalreserve.gov/econres/ifdp/files/ifdp1260.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. M. Ayhan Kose & Peter S. O. Nagle & Franziska Ohnsorge & Naotaka Sugawara, 2020. "Can This Time Be Different? Policy Options in Times of Rising Debt," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 2008, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    China; Financial crisis; Spillovers; Financial system;

    JEL classification:

    • F30 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - General
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • E60 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - General

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