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Citations for "Risk Sharing in Private Information Models With Asset Accumulation: Explaining the Excess Smoothness of Consumption"

by Orazio P. Attanasio & Nicola Pavoni

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  1. José María Casado García, 2008. "From Income to Consumption: Measuring Households Partial Insurance," Working Papers 2008-09, FEDEA.
  2. Katsuyuki Shibayama, 2015. "Trend Dominance in Macroeconomic Fluctuations," Studies in Economics 1518, School of Economics, University of Kent.
  3. Giovanni Gallipoli & Laura Turner, 2009. "Household Responses to Individual Shocks: Disability and Labor Supply," Working Paper Series 04_09, The Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
  4. Alexander Karaivanov & Robert M. Townsend, 2013. "Dynamic Financial Constraints: Distinguishing Mechanism Design from Exogenously Incomplete Regimes," NBER Working Papers 19617, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Laurence Ales & Pricila Maziero, 2007. "Accounting for private information," 2007 Meeting Papers 804, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  6. Marcus Hagedorn, 2016. "A Demand Theory of the Price Level," 2016 Meeting Papers 941, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  7. Tobias Broer & Marek Kapicka & Paul Klein, 2017. "Consumption Risk Sharing with Private Information and Limited Enforcement," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 23, pages 170-190, January.
  8. Krislert Samphantharak & Robert Townsend, 2013. "Risk and Return in Village Economies," NBER Working Papers 19738, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Vitor F. Luz & Carlos E. da Costa, 2011. "Separability and Memory: Micro Causes, Macro Consequences," 2011 Meeting Papers 916, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  10. Tobias Broer, 2009. "Stationary equilibrium distributions in economies with limited commitment," Economics Working Papers ECO2009/39, European University Institute.
  11. Koeniger, Winfried & Fella, Giulio & Frache, Serafin, 2016. "Buffer-Stock Saving and Households' Response to Income Shocks," Economics Working Paper Series 1617, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
  12. Joachim De Weerdt & Garance Genicot & Alice Mesnard, 2015. "Asymmetry of Information within Family Networks," NBER Working Papers 21685, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Hagedorn, Marcus, 2016. "A Demand Theory of the Price Level," CEPR Discussion Papers 11364, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  14. Orazio Attanasio & Erik Hurst & Luigi Pistaferri, 2012. "The Evolution of Income, Consumption, and Leisure Inequality in The US, 1980-2010," NBER Working Papers 17982, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Daniel L. McFadden, 2013. "The New Science of Pleasure," NBER Working Papers 18687, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. Katja Kaufmann & Luigi Pistaferri, 2009. "Disentangling Insurance and Information in Intertemporal Consumption Choices," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 387-392, May.
  17. Orazio Attanasio & Costas Meghir & Corina Mommaerts, 2015. "Insurance in extended family networks," NBER Working Papers 21059, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  18. William Jack & Tavneet Suri, 2014. "Risk Sharing and Transactions Costs: Evidence from Kenya's Mobile Money Revolution," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(1), pages 183-223, January.
  19. Jonathan Heathcote & Kjetil Storesletten & Giovanni L. Violante, 2009. "Quantitative Macroeconomics with Heterogeneous Households," NBER Working Papers 14768, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  20. Nie, Jun & Luo, Yulei & Wang, Gaowang & Young, Eric R., 2014. "What we don’t know doesn’t hurt us: rational inattention and the permanent income hypothesis in general equilibrium," Research Working Paper RWP 14-14, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
  21. Daniel McFadden, 2014. "The new science of pleasure: consumer choice behavior and the measurement of well-being," Chapters, in: Handbook of Choice Modelling, chapter 2, pages 7-48 Edward Elgar Publishing.
  22. Juan Urquiza, 2011. "Income Asymmetries and the Permanent Income Hypothesis," Documentos de Trabajo 409, Instituto de Economia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile..
  23. Greg Kaplan & Giovanni L. Violante, 2009. "How Much Consumption Insurance Beyond Self-Insurance?," NBER Working Papers 15553, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  24. Deaton, Angus, 2015. "Measuring and understanding behavior, welfare, and poverty," Nobel Prize in Economics documents 2015-3, Nobel Prize Committee.
  25. Heathcote, Jonathan & Storesletten, Kjetil & Violante, Giovanni L, 2007. "Consumption and Labour Supply with Partial Insurance: An Analytical Framework," CEPR Discussion Papers 6280, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  26. Antonella Tutino, 2012. "Online Appendix to "Rationally inattentive consumption choices"," Technical Appendices 11-143, Review of Economic Dynamics.
  27. Martin Beznoska & Richard Ochmann, 2012. "Liquidity Constraints and the Permanent Income Hypothesis: Pseudo Panel Estimation with German Consumption Survey Data," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1231, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  28. Sanghamitra Bandyopadhyay, 2012. "The Vulnerable Are Not (Necessarily) the Poor," Working Papers 40, Queen Mary, University of London, School of Business and Management, Centre for Globalisation Research.
  29. Demyanyk, Yuliya & Hryshko, Dmytro & Luengo-Prado, Maria Jose & Sorensen, Bent E., 2015. "The rise and fall of consumption in the '00s," Working Papers 15-12, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  30. Orazio Attanasio & Erik Hurst & Luigi Pistaferri, 2014. "The Evolution of Income, Consumption, and Leisure Inequality in the United States, 1980–2010," NBER Chapters, in: Improving the Measurement of Consumer Expenditures, pages 100-140 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  31. Meghir, Costas & Pistaferri, Luigi, 2011. "Earnings, Consumption and Life Cycle Choices," Handbook of Labor Economics, Elsevier.
  32. Gianluca Violante & Greg Kaplan, 2008. "How Much Insurance in Bewley Models?," 2008 Meeting Papers 522, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  33. Orazio Attanasio & Margherita Borella, 2006. "Stochastic Components of Individual Consumption: A Time Series Analysis of Grouped Data," NBER Working Papers 12456, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  34. Sisi Zhang, 2014. "Wage shocks, household labor supply, and income instability," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 27(3), pages 767-796, July.
  35. Emil Iantchev, 2013. "Asset-Pricing Implications of Biologically Based Non-Expected Utility," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 16(3), pages 497-510, July.
  36. Costa, Carlos Eugênio da & Luz, Vitor Farinha, 2010. "The private memory of aggregate shocks," Economics Working Papers (Ensaios Economicos da EPGE) 706, FGV/EPGE Escola Brasileira de Economia e Finanças, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil).
  37. Broer, Tobias, 2011. "The wrong shape of insurance? What cross-sectional distributions tell us about models of consumption-smoothing," CEPR Discussion Papers 8701, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  38. Rita Ginja, 2010. "Income Shocks and Investments in Human Capital," 2010 Meeting Papers 1165, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  39. Arna Vardardottir & Michaela Pagel, 2016. "The Liquid Hand-to-Mouth: Evidence from a Personal Finance Management Software," 2016 Meeting Papers 789, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  40. Demyanyk, Yuliya & Luengo-Prado, Maria Jose & Hryshko, Dmytro & Sorensen, Bent E., 2015. "The Rise and Fall of Consumption in the 2000s," Working Paper 1507, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  41. Monica Ospina, 2010. "CCT programs for consumption insurance: evidence from Colombia," DOCUMENTOS DE TRABAJO CIEF 010612, UNIVERSIDAD EAFIT.
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