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Citations for "Testing the Sticky Information Phillips Curve"

by Olivier Coibion

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  1. Olivier Coibion & Yuriy Gorodnichenko, 2010. "Information Rigidity and the Expectations Formation Process: A Simple Framework and New Facts," Working Papers 102, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary.
  2. Arslan, M. Murat, 2010. "Relative importance of sticky prices and sticky information in price setting," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1124-1135, September.
  3. Carrera Cesar, 2012. "Estimating Information Rigidity Using Firms' Survey Data," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 12(1), pages 1-34, June.
  4. Easaw Joshy & Golinelli Roberto, 2010. "Households Forming Inflation Expectations: Active and Passive Absorption Rates," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-32, November.
  5. Olivier Coibion & Yuriy Gorodnichenko, 2011. "Strategic Interaction among Heterogeneous Price-Setters in an Estimated DSGE Model," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(3), pages 920-940, August.
  6. Marcelle Chauvet & Insu Kim, 2010. "Microfoundations of inflation persistence in the New Keynesian Phillips curve," CQER Working Paper 2010-05, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  7. Carrillo Julio A., 2009. "Sticky information vs. Backward-looking indexation: Inflation inertia in the U.S," Research Memorandum 008, Maastricht University, Maastricht Research School of Economics of Technology and Organization (METEOR).
  8. Olivier Coibion & Yuriy Gorodnichenko, 2008. "What Can Survey Forecasts Tell Us About Informational Rigidities?," NBER Working Papers 14586, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Lanne, Markku & Luoma, Arto & Luoto, Jani, 2008. "A Naïve Sticky Information Model of Households’ Inflation Expectations," MPRA Paper 8663, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. James M. Nason & Gregor W. Smith, 2014. "Measuring the Slowly Evolving Trend in US Inflation with Professional Forecasts," CAMA Working Papers 2014-07, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  11. Benjamin D. Keen & Evan F. Koenig, 2009. "How robust are popular models of nominal frictions?," Working Papers 0903, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  12. Goecke, Henry & Luhan, Wolfgang J. & Roos, Michael W.M., 2013. "Rational inattentiveness in a forecasting experiment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 80-89.
  13. Orlando Gomes, 2012. "Transitional Dynamics in Sticky-Information General Equilibrium Models," Computational Economics, Society for Computational Economics, vol. 39(4), pages 387-407, April.
  14. Benedetto Molinari, 2010. "Sticky Information and Inflation Persistence: Evidence from U.S. Data," Working Papers 10.09, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Department of Economics.
  15. Hunt Allcott & Nathan Wozny, 2012. "Gasoline Prices, Fuel Economy, and the Energy Paradox," NBER Working Papers 18583, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. Hervé Le Bihan & Philippe Andrade, 2010. "Inattentive Professional Forecasters," 2010 Meeting Papers 1144, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  17. Lance Kent, 2015. "Relaxing Rational Expectations," Working Papers 159, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary.
  18. Gomes, Orlando, 2012. "Thought experimentation and the Phillips curve," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(1), pages 45-64.
  19. Daley, Clayton, 2007. "A “Local” Model of the Firm: Sticky prices and the Phillips Curve," MPRA Paper 4012, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 11 Jul 2007.
  20. James M. Nason & Gregor W. Smith, 2013. "Reverse Kalman filtering U.S. inflation with sticky professional forecasts," Working Papers 13-34, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
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