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Inflation, Information Rigidity, and the Sticky Information Phillips Curve

  • César Carrera

    (Central Reserve Bank of Peru)

  • Nelson Ramírez-Rondán

    (Central Reserve Bank of Peru)

The Great Moderation is characterized for being a stable period in terms of macroeconomic conditions, specially in inflation. In terms of the sticky information theory, this environment may provide few incentives for agents to update information on inflation and then a new slope of the sticky information Phillips curve should be observed. We estimate the degree of information rigidity implied by the sticky information Phillips curve proposed by Mankiw and Reis (2002). Using threshold models we identify regimes of high and low inflation and find that each regime is associated with a specific degree of information stickiness. We find evidence that agents update information faster when inflation is higher.

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Paper provided by Peruvian Economic Association in its series Working Papers with number 2014-1.

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Date of creation: Jan 2014
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Handle: RePEc:apc:wpaper:2014-001
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  1. Olivier Coibion & Yuriy Gorodnichenko, 2012. "What Can Survey Forecasts Tell Us about Information Rigidities?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 120(1), pages 116 - 159.
  2. N. Gregory Mankiw & Ricardo Reis, 2001. "Sticky Information Versus Sticky Prices: A Proposal to Replace the New Keynesian Phillips Curve," NBER Working Papers 8290, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Kiley, Michael T, 2000. "Endogenous Price Stickiness and Business Cycle Persistence," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 32(1), pages 28-53, February.
  4. Carl E. Walsh, 2010. "Monetary Theory and Policy, Third Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 3, volume 1, number 0262013770, June.
  5. Christopher D. Carroll, 2003. "Macroeconomic Expectations Of Households And Professional Forecasters," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 118(1), pages 269-298, February.
  6. V. V. Chari & Patrick J. Kehoe & Ellen R. McGrattan, 1996. "Sticky Price Models of the Business Cycle: Can the Contract Multiplier Solve the Persistence Problem?," NBER Working Papers 5809, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Oleg Korenok, 2005. "Empirical Comparison of Sticky Price and Sticky Information Models," Working Papers 0501, VCU School of Business, Department of Economics.
  8. Khan, Hashmat & Zhu, Zhenhua, 2006. "Estimates of the Sticky-Information Phillips Curve for the United States," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 38(1), pages 195-207, February.
  9. Klenow, Peter J. & Willis, Jonathan L., 2007. "Sticky information and sticky prices," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(Supplemen), pages 79-99, September.
  10. Michael Kiley, 2005. "A Quantitative Comparison Of Sticky-Price And Sticky-Information Models Of Price Setting," Computing in Economics and Finance 2005 183, Society for Computational Economics.
  11. Julio Rotemberg & Michael Woodford, 1997. "An Optimization-Based Econometric Framework for the Evaluation of Monetary Policy," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1997, Volume 12, pages 297-361 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Bruce E. Hansen, 1996. "Sample Splitting and Threshold Estimation," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 319., Boston College Department of Economics, revised 12 May 1998.
  13. Carrera, César, 2012. "Estimating Information Rigidity using Firms’ Survey Data," Working Papers 2012-004, Banco Central de Reserva del Perú.
  14. Lucas, Robert E, Jr, 1973. "Some International Evidence on Output-Inflation Tradeoffs," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 63(3), pages 326-34, June.
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