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Sticky information and sticky prices

  • Klenow, Peter J.
  • Willis, Jonathan L.

In the U.S. and Europe, prices change somewhere between every six months and once a year. Yet nominal macro shocks seem to have real effects lasting well beyond a year. "Sticky information" models, as posited by Sims (2003), Woodford (2003), and Mankiw and Reis (2002), can reconcile micro flexibility with macro rigidity. We simulate a sticky information model in which price setters do not update their information on macro shocks as often as they update their information on micro shocks. Compared to a standard menu cost model, price changes in this model reflect older macro shocks. We then examine price changes in the micro data underlying the U.S. CPI. These price changes do not reflect older information, thereby exhibiting a similar response to that of the standard menu cost model. However, the empirical test hinges on staggered information updating across firms; it cannot distinguish between a full information model and a model where firms have equally old information.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Monetary Economics.

Volume (Year): 54 (2007)
Issue (Month): Supplement 1 (September)
Pages: 79-99

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Handle: RePEc:eee:moneco:v:54:y:2007:i:sup1:p:79-99
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505566

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