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Estimating Information Rigidity Using Firms' Survey Data

  • Carrera Cesar

    ()

    (Banco Central de Reserva del Peru ()

The slope of the sticky information Phillips curve proposed by Mankiw and Reis (2002) is based on the degree of information rigidity on the part of firms. Carroll (2003) uses an epidemiology model of expectations and finds evidence for the U.S. of a one-year lag in the transmission of information from professional forecasters to households. Using financial institutions’ and firms’ survey data from Peru and the model proposed by Carroll, I estimate the degree of information rigidity for the Peruvian economy. This paper also considers heterogeneous responses and explores the cross-sectional dimension of these survey forecasts. I find that the degree of information stickiness ranges between one and two quarters, a result that is robust to different specifications.

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Article provided by De Gruyter in its journal The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics.

Volume (Year): 12 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 (June)
Pages: 1-34

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Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejmac:v:12:y:2012:i:1:n:13
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