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Citations for "Are Parents Investing Less Time in Children? Trends in Selected Industrialized Countries"

by Anne H. Gauthier & Timothy M. Smeeding & Frank F. Furstenberg

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  1. Giménez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Molina, Jose Alberto & Ortega, Raquel, 2015. "As my parents at home? Gender differences in childrens’ housework between Germany and Spain," MPRA Paper 62699, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Jonathan Guryan & Erik Hurst & Melissa Schettini Kearney, 2008. "Parental Education and Parental Time With Children," NBER Working Papers 13993, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Bruno Falcão & Rodrigo Soares, 2006. "The Demographic Transition and the Sexual Division of Labor," 2006 Meeting Papers 49, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  4. Ragni Hege Kitterød & Marit Rønsen, 2013. "Does more involved fathering imply a double burden for fathers in Norway?," Discussion Papers 753, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  5. Gimenez-Nadal, Jose Ignacio & Sevilla, Almudena, 2012. "Trends in time allocation: A cross-country analysis," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(6), pages 1338-1359.
  6. Oriel Sullivan, 2007. "Cultural voraciousness - A new measure of the pace of leisure in a context of 'harriedness'," electronic International Journal of Time Use Research, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)) and The International Association for Time Use Research (IATUR), vol. 4(1), pages 30-46, September.
  7. Fox, Liana & Han, Wen-Jui & Ruhm, Christopher J. & Waldfogel, Jane, 2011. "Time for Children: Trends in the Employment Patterns of Parents, 1967-2009," IZA Discussion Papers 5761, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Monika Hjeds Löfmark, 2007. "Gender and time allocation differences in Taganrog, Russia," electronic International Journal of Time Use Research, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)) and The International Association for Time Use Research (IATUR), vol. 4(1), pages 69-92, September.
  9. Anne Roeters, 2013. "Cross-National Differences in the Association Between Parental Work Hours and Time with Children in Europe: A Multilevel Analysis," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 110(2), pages 637-658, January.
  10. Paul Glavin & Amanda Peters, 2015. "The Costs of Caring: Caregiver Strain and Work-Family Conflict Among Canadian Workers," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(1), pages 5-20, March.
  11. Hiromi Ono & Rosemary Yeilding, 2009. "Marriage, Cohabitation and Childcare: The US and Sweden," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 93(1), pages 137-140, August.
  12. José Ignacio Gimenez-Nadal & José Alberto Molina & Raquel Ortega, 2010. "Unemployment and Time Use: Evidence from the Spanish Time Use Survey," Documentos de Trabajo dt2010-02, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Zaragoza.
  13. Jens Bonke & Frederik Gerstoft, 2007. "Stress, time use and gender," electronic International Journal of Time Use Research, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)) and The International Association for Time Use Research (IATUR), vol. 4(1), pages 47-68, September.
  14. Bettina Casad & Amy Marcus-Newhall & Brandon Nakawaki & Alian Kasabian & Judith LeMaster, 2012. "Younger Age at First Childbirth Predicts Mothers’ Lower Economic and Psychological Well-Being Later in Life," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 33(4), pages 421-435, December.
  15. Anne Roeters & Mariëlle Cloïn & Tanja van der Lippe, 2014. "Solitary Time and Mental Health in the Netherlands," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 119(2), pages 925-941, November.
  16. Zhu, Guozhong & Vuralz, Gulfer, 2012. "Inter-generational effect of parental time and its policy implications," MPRA Paper 40670, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  17. Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Molina, Jose Alberto, 2015. "Health status and the allocation of time: Cross-country evidence from Europe," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 188-203.
  18. Jose Gimenez-Nadal & Almudena Sevilla-Sanz, 2011. "The Time-Crunch Paradox," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 102(2), pages 181-196, June.
  19. Satvika Chalasani, 2007. "The changing relationship between parents’ education and their time with children," electronic International Journal of Time Use Research, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)) and The International Association for Time Use Research (IATUR), vol. 4(1), pages 93-117, September.
  20. Alex Sienaert, 2008. "Some Child Cost Estimates for South Africa," CSAE Working Paper Series 2008-15, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  21. Adele Menniti & Pietro Demurtas & Serena Arima & Alessandra De Rose, . "Gender inequality at home when mothers work. The case of Italy," Working Papers 130/14, Sapienza University of Rome, Metodi e modelli per l'economia, il territorio e la finanza MEMOTEF.
  22. Hannu Piekkola & Liisa Leijola, 2007. "Time use and options for retirement in Europe," electronic International Journal of Time Use Research, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)) and The International Association for Time Use Research (IATUR), vol. 4(1), pages 1-29, September.
  23. Nielsen, Eric, 2015. "The Income-Achievement Gap and Adult Outcome Inequality," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2015-41, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  24. Daniela Del Boca & Anna Laura Mancini, 2013. "Parental time and child outcomes. Does gender matter?," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 187, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  25. Almudena Sevilla-Sanz & Jose Ignacio Gimenez-Nadal, 2010. "The Time-crunch Paradox," Economics Series Working Papers 483, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
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