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Institutions and the transition to adulthood: Implications for fertility tempo in low-fertility settings

  • Ronald R. Rindfuss
  • Sarah R. Brauner-Otto
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    The number of countries experiencing very low fertility has been rising in recent years, garnering increasing academic, political and media attention. There is now widespread academic agreement that the postponement of fertility is a major contributing factor in the very low levels of fertility that have occurred, and yet most policy discussions have been devoted to increasing the numbers of children women have. We discuss factors in three institutions--the educational system, the labour market and the housing market--that may inadvertently have led to childbearing postponement. We highlight important components of the timing of childbearing, including its changing place within the transition to adulthood across countries and the significance of the demands of childbearing versus childrearing. Using illustrations from Europe, North America, Japan, Australia and New Zealand, we argue that the following all lead to younger childbearing: 1) an open education system whereby it is relatively easy to return to school after having dropped out for a while; 2) a shorter, smoother, easier school-to-work transition; 3) easier re-entry into the labour market after having taken time out for childrearing or any other reason; 4) greater capability of integrating childrearing into a career; 5) easier ability to obtain a mortgage with a moderately small down payment, moderately low interest rate and a long time period over which to repay the loan; and 6) easier ability to rent a dwelling unit at an affordable price. Conversely, reversing any or all of these factors would lead, other things being equal, to postponement of childbearing.

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    File URL: http://epub.oeaw.ac.at/0xc1aa500d_0x001c9ea0
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    Article provided by Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna in its journal Vienna Yearbook of Population Research.

    Volume (Year): 6 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 57-87

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    Handle: RePEc:vid:yearbk:v:6:y:2008:i:1:p:57-87
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.oeaw.ac.at/vid/

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    1. Zhu Xiao Di & Xiaodong Liu, 2006. "The Effects of Housing Push Factors and Rent Expectations on Household Formation of Young Adults," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 28(2), pages 149-166.
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    5. Aassve, Arnstein & Davia, Maria A. & Iacovou, Maria, 2005. "Does leaving home make you poor? Evidence from 13 European countries," ISER Working Paper Series 2005-24, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    6. Nancy Folbre & Jayoung Yoon & Kade Finnoff & Allison Fuligni, 2005. "By what measure? family time devoted to children in the united states," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 42(2), pages 373-390, May.
    7. Angelika Tölke & Martin Diewald, 2003. "Insecurities in employment and occupational careers and their impact on the transition to fatherhood in Western Germany," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 9(3), pages 41-68, September.
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    10. Hans-Peter Kohler & Francesco C. Billari & José Antonio Ortega, 2002. "The Emergence of Lowest-Low Fertility in Europe During the 1990s," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 28(4), pages 641-680.
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    13. repec:cai:poeine:pope_203_0475 is not listed on IDEAS
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