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Siesta: A theory of freelancing


  • Maria Saez Marti


I study the effect of fatigue and innate ability on performance in a model with incomplete contracts, lumpy tasks requiring multiple periods of work and stochastic productivity shocks. I find that increasing ability or reducing fatigue does not lead necessarily to more productive efficiency, since it may exacerbate the incentive for agents take "too much" on-the-job leisure. In a world with heterogenous agents, the problem may be ameliorated by the introduction of a dual labour market with free-lancers (who can take breaks at their discretion) and regular workers (who work on a fixed schedule).

Suggested Citation

  • Maria Saez Marti, 2011. "Siesta: A theory of freelancing," ECON - Working Papers 055, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
  • Handle: RePEc:zur:econwp:055

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    12. Beaudry, Paul & DiNardo, John, 1991. "The Effect of Implicit Contracts on the Movement of Wages over the Business Cycle: Evidence from Micro Data," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(4), pages 665-688, August.
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    15. Bartling, Björn & Schmidt, Klaus M., 2012. "Reference Points in Renegotiations: The Role of Contracts and Competition," Discussion Paper Series of SFB/TR 15 Governance and the Efficiency of Economic Systems 385, Free University of Berlin, Humboldt University of Berlin, University of Bonn, University of Mannheim, University of Munich.
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    More about this item


    Breaks; leisure; productivity; freelancing;

    JEL classification:

    • D0 - Microeconomics - - General
    • D8 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty
    • D9 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics
    • M51 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Firm Employment Decisions; Promotions
    • M55 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Labor Contracting Devices

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