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The Expectations Channel of Climate Change:Implications for Monetary Policy

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  • Müller, Gernot
  • Dietrich, Alexander
  • Schoenle, Raphael

Abstract

Using a representative consumer survey in the U.S., we elicit beliefs about the economic impact of climate change. Respondents perceive a high probability of costly, rare disasters in the near future due to climate change, but not much of an impact on GDP growth. Salience of rare disasters through media coverage increases the disaster probability by up to 7 percentage points. We analyze these findings through the lens of a New Keynesian model with rare disasters. First, we illustrate how expectations of rare disasters impact economic activity. Second, we calibrate the model to capture the key aspects of the survey and quantify the expectation channel of climate change: disaster expectations lower the natural rate of interest by about 65 basis points and, assuming a conventional Taylor rule for monetary policy, inflation and the output gap by 0.3 and 0.2 percentage points, respectively. The effect is considerably stronger if monetary policy is constrained by the effective lower bound.

Suggested Citation

  • Müller, Gernot & Dietrich, Alexander & Schoenle, Raphael, 2021. "The Expectations Channel of Climate Change:Implications for Monetary Policy," VfS Annual Conference 2021 (Virtual Conference): Climate Economics 242446, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc21:242446
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    Cited by:

    1. William Ginn, 2022. "Climate Disasters and the Macroeconomy: Does State-Dependence Matter? Evidence for the US," Economics of Disasters and Climate Change, Springer, vol. 6(1), pages 141-161, March.
    2. Patrick Gruning, 2022. "Fiscal, Environmental, and Bank Regulation Policies in a Small Open Economy for the Green Transition," Working Papers 2022/06, Latvijas Banka.
    3. Alessandro Cantelmo, 2022. "Rare Disasters, the Natural Interest Rate and Monetary Policy," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 84(3), pages 473-496, June.
    4. Ferrari Massimo, & Pagliari Maria Sole,, 2021. "No country is an island. International cooperation and climate change," Working papers 815, Banque de France.
    5. : Annicciarico, Barbara & : Di Dio, Fabio & : Dilusio, Francesca, 2022. "Climate Actions, Market Beliefs, and Monetary Policy," Working Papers 2022-14, Joint Research Centre, European Commission.
    6. Boneva, Lena & Ferrucci, Gianluigi & Mongelli, Francesco Paolo, 2021. "To be or not to be “green”: how can monetary policy react to climate change?," Occasional Paper Series 285, European Central Bank.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Climate change; Disasters; Households Expectations; Survey; Media focus; Monetary policy; Natural rate of interest; Paradox of Communication;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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