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The Transmission of US Financial Stress: Evidence for Emerging Market Economies

  • Schüler, Yves S.
  • Fink, Fabian
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    We provide empirical evidence that US financial stress shocks (US-FSSs) are an important driver for economic dynamics and fluctuations in emerging market economies (EMEs). Applying a structural vector autoregression, we analyze the international transmission of US-FSSs to eight EMEs using monthly data from 1999 to 2012. US-FSSs are identified as unexpected changes in the financial conditions index of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. Findings indicate that a typical EME experiences similar negative effects as the US economy in response to US-FSSs. Our results emphasize that the transmission through international financial interconnections is dominant, while contagion through trade is inessential. Further, with regard to fluctuations in real economic activity, US-FSSs are as important as all other external factors jointly. In general, US-FSSs represent a crucial driver for volatility in the emerging world; also at business cycle frequencies.

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    File URL: http://econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/79692/1/VfS_2013_pid_57.pdf
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    Paper provided by Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association in its series Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order with number 79692.

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    Date of creation: 2013
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    Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc13:79692
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.socialpolitik.org/Email:


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