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Estimating gravity equations with endogeneous trade costs

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  • Rudolph, Stephan

Abstract

A basic assumption of the gravity equation of international trade is that increasing trade costs lower exports. Butintuition and theory imply that a high export volume lowers bilateral trade costs as well, because a fixed cost intensivetrade sector probably bears lower average costs with more trade. In this case, standard gravity estimation might bebiased due to simultaneity. This paper finds an empirical interdependency between exports and trade costs. Using asimultaneous equation model to face this problem improves the estimates compared to the standard gravity specification.

Suggested Citation

  • Rudolph, Stephan, 2010. "Estimating gravity equations with endogeneous trade costs," Dresden Discussion Paper Series in Economics 01/10, Technische Universität Dresden, Faculty of Business and Economics, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:tuddps:0110
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. James E. Anderson & Eric van Wincoop, 2003. "Gravity with Gravitas: A Solution to the Border Puzzle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 170-192, March.
    2. Dennis Novy, 2013. "Gravity Redux: Measuring International Trade Costs With Panel Data," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 51(1), pages 101-121, January.
    3. Laszlo Matyas, 1997. "Proper Econometric Specification of the Gravity Model," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(3), pages 363-368, May.
    4. I-Hui Cheng & Howard J. Wall, 2005. "Controlling for heterogeneity in gravity models of trade and integration," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Jan, pages 49-63.
    5. David H. Romer & Jeffrey A. Frankel, 1999. "Does Trade Cause Growth?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 379-399, June.
    6. Rudolph, Stephan, 2009. "The gravity equation with micro-founded trade costs," Dresden Discussion Paper Series in Economics 11/09, Technische Universität Dresden, Faculty of Business and Economics, Department of Economics.
    7. Baltagi, Badi H. & Egger, Peter & Pfaffermayr, Michael, 2003. "A generalized design for bilateral trade flow models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 80(3), pages 391-397, September.
    8. Elhanan Helpman & Marc Melitz & Yona Rubinstein, 2008. "Estimating Trade Flows: Trading Partners and Trading Volumes," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 123(2), pages 441-487.
    9. McCallum, John, 1995. "National Borders Matter: Canada-U.S. Regional Trade Patterns," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(3), pages 615-623, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Udo Broll & Andreas Förster & Stephan Rudolph, 2010. "Die Handelskosten von Sachsen," ifo Dresden berichtet, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 17(06), pages 17-22, December.
    2. Julia Spies & Joern Kleinert, 2011. "Transport Costs in International Trade," ERSA conference papers ersa11p625, European Regional Science Association.
    3. Joern Kleinert & Julia Spies, 2011. "Endogenous Transport Costs in International Trade," IAW Discussion Papers 74, Institut für Angewandte Wirtschaftsforschung (IAW).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gravity Equation; Trade Policy; Simultaneity Problem;

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F17 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Forecasting and Simulation
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C5 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling

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