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Fiscal Position of Immigrants in Europe: A Quantile Regression Approach

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  • Joxhe, Majlinda
  • Scaramozzino, Pasquale
  • Zanaj, Skerdilajda

Abstract

This paper compares the net fiscal position (NFP) of immigrants versus natives using data from the European Survey on Living Conditions (EU-SILC) for the period 2007-2015. By employing a quantile regression approach, we find that European and non-European migrants have a different fiscal position from natives only on the extreme tails of the NFP distribution. Non-EU migrants contribute more than natives in the top quantile of the NFP, whereas they are more fiscally depend in the bottom quantile. We also examine the relationship between our calculated migrants' fiscal position and the fiscal perception of European citizens versus migrants as measured in European Social Survey (ESS) data. The negative perception in some European countries may be entirely driven by the fiscal position of migrants in the lowest quantile. Our results highlight the critical need to better understand the fiscal contribution of migrants in the destination countries for a fair and constructive migration policy

Suggested Citation

  • Joxhe, Majlinda & Scaramozzino, Pasquale & Zanaj, Skerdilajda, 2021. "Fiscal Position of Immigrants in Europe: A Quantile Regression Approach," GLO Discussion Paper Series 758, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:758
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    fiscal position; immigration; quantile regression; European countries;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H53 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Welfare Programs
    • I30 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration

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