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Gendered Effects of Employment Protection on Earnings Mobility

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  • Bárcena-Martín, Elena
  • Medina-Claros, Samuel
  • Pérez-Moreno, Salvador

Abstract

This paper explores potential gendered effects of employment protection on earnings mobility, differentiating between upward and downward movements. We conduct a micro-macro mobility analysis for 23 European countries over the economic downturn period 2008–2014. The results confirm that, overall, the higher the protection for regular contracts, the lower the earnings mobility (either upwards or downwards) although the effect is stronger among women of high reproductive age. Nevertheless, protection for temporary employment seems to be only associated with reduced downward earnings mobility when considering transitions into and out of employment, with no gender differential effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Bárcena-Martín, Elena & Medina-Claros, Samuel & Pérez-Moreno, Salvador, 2020. "Gendered Effects of Employment Protection on Earnings Mobility," GLO Discussion Paper Series 547, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:547
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    earnings mobility; employment protection; European countries; gender;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • J08 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics Policies
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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