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The dynamics of poverty in the first three waves of NIDS


  • Finn, Arden

    (SALDRU, School of Economics, University of Cape Town)

  • Leibbrandt, Murray



We use the first three waves of data from the National Income Dynamics Study (NIDS) to analyse poverty dynamics in South Africa between 2008 and 2012. Restricting ourselves to the sub-sample of balanced panel respondents, we find that poverty exit rates increased with time, though a substantial proportion of the population was trapped in severe poverty, defined as having income of less than half of the poverty line. The importance of demographic events in the household as drivers of poverty transitions are highlighted in a univariate and multivariate setting. Finally we look at the joint distributions of multidimensional poverty and income poverty in order to ascertain the extent to which they complement or offset one another.

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  • Finn, Arden & Leibbrandt, Murray, 2013. "The dynamics of poverty in the first three waves of NIDS," SALDRU Working Papers 119, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
  • Handle: RePEc:ldr:wpaper:119

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ingrid Woolard & Stephan Klasen, 2005. "Determinants of Income Mobility and Household Poverty Dynamics in South Africa," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(5), pages 865-897.
    2. Alkire, Sabina & Foster, James, 2011. "Counting and multidimensional poverty measurement," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(7-8), pages 476-487, August.
    3. Lloyd Grieger & April Williamson & Murray Leibbrandt & James Levinsohn, 2013. "Moving out and moving in: Evidence of short-term household change in South Africa from the National Income Dynamics Study," SALDRU Working Papers 106, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    4. Jorge Ag├╝ero & Michael R. Carter & Julian May, 2007. "Poverty and Inequality in the First Decade of South Africa's Democracy: What can be Learnt from Panel Data from KwaZulu-Natal?," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 16(5), pages 782-812, November.
    5. Jenkins, Stephen P., 2011. "Changing Fortunes: Income Mobility and Poverty Dynamics in Britain," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199226436, June.
    6. Murray Leibbrandt & Ingrid Woolard & Arden Finn & Jonathan Argent, 2010. "Trends in South African Income Distribution and Poverty since the Fall of Apartheid," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 101, OECD Publishing.
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    Cited by:

    1. Finn, Arden & Leibbrandt, Murray, 2013. "Mobility and Inequality in the First Three Waves of NIDS," SALDRU Working Papers 120, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    2. Arden Finn & Murray Leibbrandt, 2016. "The dynamics of poverty in the first four waves of NIDS," SALDRU Working Papers 174, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    3. Atika Pasha, 2016. "Impact of Cash Grants on Multidimensional Poverty in South Africa," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 208, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    4. Kehinde O. Omotoso & Steven F. Koch, 2017. "Exploring Child Poverty and Inequality in Post-Apartheid South Africa: A Multidimensional Perspective," Working Papers 201718, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.

    More about this item


    poverty; households; South Africa; National Income Dynamics Study; NIDS;

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