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Income inequality from a lifetime perspective

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  • Corneo, Giacomo

Abstract

Studying lifetime income inequality for individuals who belong to the same cohort can contribute valuable insights that cannot be obtained by usual analyses of annual incomes. Data from the social security system indicates that in West Germany, over the cohorts born between 1935 and 1972, lifetime earnings inequality has strongly increased. For male baby-boomers, lifetime inequality is predicted to be 85 % larger than in the case of their fathers. This is larger than the increase of inequality in the cross-section and points to dramatic intergenerational changes in the German labor market.

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  • Corneo, Giacomo, 2014. "Income inequality from a lifetime perspective," Discussion Papers 2014/30, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:fubsbe:201430
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    1. Eswar S. Prasad, 2004. "The Unbearable Stability of the German Wage Structure: Evidence and Interpretation," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 51(2), pages 354-385.
    2. David Card & Jörg Heining & Patrick Kline, 2013. "Workplace Heterogeneity and the Rise of West German Wage Inequality," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 128(3), pages 967-1015.
    3. Gernandt Johannes & Pfeiffer Friedhelm, 2007. "Rising Wage Inequality in Germany," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 227(4), pages 358-380, August.
    4. Mark Huggett & Gustavo Ventura & Amir Yaron, 2011. "Sources of Lifetime Inequality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(7), pages 2923-2954, December.
    5. Nicola Fuchs-Schuendeln & Dirk Krueger & Mathias Sommer, 2010. "Inequality Trends for Germany in the Last Two Decades: A Tale of Two Countries," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 13(1), pages 103-132, January.
    6. Timm Bönke & Giacomo Corneo & Holger Lüthen, 2015. "Lifetime Earnings Inequality in Germany," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(1), pages 171-208.
    7. Audra J. Bowlus & Jean-Marc Robin, 2012. "An International Comparison Of Lifetime Inequality: How Continental Europe Resembles North America," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 10(6), pages 1236-1262, December.
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    9. Jonathan Heathcote & Kjetil Storesletten & Giovanni L. Violante, 2005. "Two Views of Inequality Over the Life Cycle," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 3(2-3), pages 765-775, 04/05.
    10. Clemens Hetschko, 2016. "On the misery of losing self-employment," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 47(2), pages 461-478, August.
    11. Stefan Bach & Giacomo Corneo & Viktor Steiner, 2009. "From Bottom To Top: The Entire Income Distribution In Germany, 1992-2003," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 55(2), pages 303-330, June.
    12. Wojciech Kopczuk & Emmanuel Saez & Jae Song, 2010. "Earnings Inequality and Mobility in the United States: Evidence from Social Security Data Since 1937," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 125(1), pages 91-128.
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    Cited by:

    1. Corneo Giacomo & Bönke Timm & Westermeier Christian, 2016. "Erbschaft und Eigenleistung im Vermögen der Deutschen: Eine Verteilungsanalyse," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, De Gruyter, vol. 17(1), pages 35-53, April.
    2. Gabriel Felbermayr & Michele Battisti & Sybille Lehwald, 2016. "Einkommensungleichheit in Deutschland, Teil 2: Die Rolle der Umverteilung," ifo Schnelldienst, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 69(14), pages 22-29, July.
    3. Victoria Prowse & Daniel Kemptner & Peter Hahn, 2017. "Insurance, Redistribution, and the Inequality of Lifetime Income," Purdue University Economics Working Papers 1304, Purdue University, Department of Economics.
    4. Peter Haan & Daniel Kemptner & Victoria Prowse, 2017. "Insurance, Redistribution, and the Inequality of Lifetime Income," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1716, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    5. Gunther Tichy, 2014. "Flexicurity – A Concept Doomed to Failure," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 87(8), pages 537-553, August.
    6. Gunther Tichy, 2015. "Protecting social inclusion and mobility in a low growth scenario," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 100, WWWforEurope.

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