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Men, Women and the Hiring Function

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  • Karen Mumford
  • Peter N Smith

Abstract

This paper examines the idea of ranking of groups and genders in terms of hiring probabilities. By incorporating a range of complementary data sources, measures of the three possible gross worker flows into employment, and the stocks of job seekers from which they come, are provided for both genders in the Australian labour market. We find a clear ranking of men over women in the hiring process. Indeed, in aggregate women appear to be effectively segregated from the male hiring market, whereas this is not true with males in the female hiring market. We also find that amongst males, employed job seekers are ranked above those unemployed and, in turn, above those not in the labour force. For women, the unemployed and employed are not found to be competing with each other, whilst those not in the labour force are ranked below the unemployed. We believe that this is the first study explicitly investigating these three major gross worker flows for women as well as men, enabling us to further explore the interdependent processes in the labour market by considering more fully the interactions across job seekers of different genders and from different labour market states.

Suggested Citation

  • Karen Mumford & Peter N Smith, "undated". "Men, Women and the Hiring Function," Discussion Papers 99/16, Department of Economics, University of York.
  • Handle: RePEc:yor:yorken:99/16
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    File URL: https://www.york.ac.uk/media/economics/documents/discussionpapers/1999/9916.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Burda, Michael & Wyplosz, Charles, 1994. "Gross worker and job flows in Europe," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 1287-1315, June.
    2. Steven J. Davis & John C. Haltiwanger & Scott Schuh, 1998. "Job Creation and Destruction," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262540932, January.
    3. Acemoglu, Daron & Scott, Andrew, 1994. "Asymmetries in the Cyclical Behaviour of UK Labour Markets," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(427), pages 1303-1323, November.
    4. Killingsworth, Mark R. & Heckman, James J., 1987. "Female labor supply: A survey," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & R. Layard (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 103-204 Elsevier.
    5. van Ours, Jan C., 1995. "An empirical note on employed and unemployed job search," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 49(4), pages 447-452, October.
    6. Hamilton, James D, 1989. "A New Approach to the Economic Analysis of Nonstationary Time Series and the Business Cycle," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(2), pages 357-384, March.
    7. Mumford, Karen & Smith, Peter N, 1999. " The Hiring Function Reconsidered: On Closing the Circle," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 61(3), pages 343-364, August.
    8. Budd, Alan & Levine, Paul & Smith, Peter, 1988. "Unemployment, Vacancies and the Long-term Unemployed," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 98(393), pages 1071-1091, December.
    9. Abowd, John M & Zellner, Arnold, 1985. "Estimating Gross Labor-Force Flows," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 3(3), pages 254-283, June.
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    JEL classification:

    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers

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