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Eurosclerosis or Financial Collapse: Why Did Swedish Incomes Fall Behind?

Author

Listed:
  • Valerie Cerra

    (International Monetary Fund)

  • Sweta C. Saxena

    (University of Pittsburgh)

Abstract

Sweden represents an archetypal welfare state economy, with extensive government safety nets. Some scholars have attributed a decline in its per capita income ranking since 1970 to “eurosclerosis” or sluggish growth caused by distortionary policies. This paper argues rather, that the permanent loss in output following Sweden’s banking crisis in the early 1990s explains the decline in its per capita GDP ratings. The paper finds no macroeconomic evidence that welfare state policies have deterred growth. The results warn that empirical growth analyses should distinguish between trend output growth and permanent output loss associated, for example, with financial crises.

Suggested Citation

  • Valerie Cerra & Sweta C. Saxena, 2005. "Eurosclerosis or Financial Collapse: Why Did Swedish Incomes Fall Behind?," Macroeconomics 0508007, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpma:0508007
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Olivier Damette & Mathilde Maurel & Michael A. Stemmer, 2016. "What does it take to grow out of recession? An error-correction approach towards growth convergence of European and transition countries," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 16041, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
    2. Bryan Harcy & Can Sever, 2020. "Financial Crises and Innovation," BIS Working Papers 846, Bank for International Settlements.
    3. Mevlut Tatliyer, 2017. "Inflation targeting and the need for a new central banking framework," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(4), pages 512-539, October.
    4. Sever, Can, 2018. "The myth of economic recovery: The case of crises in neighboring countries," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 164(C), pages 65-69.
    5. Susan Lund & Charles Roxburgh, 2010. "Debt and Deleveraging," World Economics, World Economics, 1 Ivory Square, Plantation Wharf, London, United Kingdom, SW11 3UE, vol. 11(2), pages 1-30, April.
    6. Nicola D. Coniglio & Francesco Prota, 2011. "Economic Crises and Regional Convergence in the EU: An Exploration of Facts, Theories and Policy Implications," Chapters, in: Wim Meeusen (ed.), The Economic Crisis and European Integration, chapter 5, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. Vidal, Jean-François, 2010. "Crises et transformations du modèle social-démocrate suédois," Revue de la Régulation - Capitalisme, institutions, pouvoirs, Association Recherche et Régulation, vol. 8.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial Crisis; Welfare State; Sweden; Output Loss;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O52 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Europe
    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies
    • H11 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - Structure and Scope of Government

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